Live Stories

Want to know what it’s like to live in Dublin? Browse all stories or categories and highlights below.

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Make A Day Of It – Dublin’s Northside

With so much to see and do on Dublin’s Northside, you’ve got to get out and enjoy it. From guided tours of Croke Park and the GAA Museum, French cuisine at Anderson's Creperie, shopping in the Arts & Business Campus in Drumcondra, or just taking a stroll around the Botanic Gardens, Dublin's Northside has it all.

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Make A Day Of It – Dublin’s Creative Quarter

The Creative Quarter of the city has so many highlights for an enjoyable and safe day out. Follow along as we make a day of it with stops including The Little Museum of Dublin, Powerscourt Centre, Article and San Lorenzo's for contemporary Italian food with a New York twist.

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Make A Day Of It – Dublin’s Historic Heart

From Dublinia to George's Street Arcade, the Historic Heart of the city has so many highlights for an enjoyable and safe day out. Follow along as we make a day of it with stops including Queen Of Tarts for coffee, the Gutter Bookshop for riveting reads and Christ Church Cathedral for 10 centuries of history.

Arts & Culture

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Recording Dublin’s diversity

As the city grows larger, the diversity of Dublin is growing too. As it stands, around a fifth of the city’s population hails from abroad. Large numbers of people from Poland, Romania, the UK, Brazil, Italy, Spain, France and Lithuania call the city home. Increasingly, migrants from across North America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East are settling in the city too. A new initiative for a changing city To reflect the city’s increasing diversity, in 2021, Creative Ireland and Dublin City Council – supported by the Gallery of Photography Ireland and D

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Meet author Ronán Hession, aka Mumblin’ Deaf Ro

“Dublin for me has always been a place to live. It’s always felt like a place where communities are, and a lot of it is not always obvious to the outsider. It’s a suburban city.” Ronán Hession is a Dub through and through. The author, musician, civil servant, husband and father was raised between Beaumont and the north inner city and now resides in Portmarnock. We sat down to chat about his creativity, grá for Dublin and what he’s looking forward to doing in the city post-lockdown. Ronán’s debut novel, Leonard and Hungry Paul, came out in 2019. In 2021, it was chosen for the

Francis Bacon's Studio.

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Dublin’s Top Ten Works of Art

The Book of Kells in Trinity is arguably Dublin’s most famous work of art, but what about all the famous Irish paintings and other international works of art in Dublin galleries? Here are ten of the major artworks hiding behind the doors you walk past every day. In the National Gallery of Ireland: With entrances on both Merrion Square and Clare Street, the National Gallery is the leading home of art in Dublin – and in Ireland. With the exception of some special exhibitions, admission is free for all. Here are just four of the masterpieces you can

the black facade of the virgin mary bar

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Dry Dublin: Non-alcoholic drinking experiences in the city

The Virgin Mary pub in Dublin It looks like Guinness. It comes out of a tap. In a bar. Yet it’s not Guinness – it’s Genius. And it’s a popular order at Dublin’s first ever high-end, dry bar. The Virgin Mary on Capel Street is not only the first of its kind in Ireland, but it’s one of the most unique dedicated non-alcoholic bars in the world. “A Genius,” says the bar’s co-founder Vaughan Yates, “is a drink that we’ve created using a non-alcohol stout and a nitro coffee combination. It’s got a ni

caryna camerino leans against the doorways of camerino bakery

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Camerino Bakery: From startup to success story

Stress baking. It’s a thing, you know. It’s what Caryna Camerino used to do after another difficult day at her old job in human resources. It was also the starting point of her successful Dublin startup: Camerino Bakery. HR to hotbuns: Caryna Camerino’s startup story Caryna Camerino, a first generation Canadian who has lived in Dublin for the past 17 years, wasn’t always a baker. However, food was always a big deal at home – partly because her father, who was from Rome, is a stickler for authentic Italian cooking. Such a stickler, in fact, that she loved going to friends’ houses where she could enjoy a regular TV dinner, like n

People & Community

Doors Closed, Hearts Open - Katie Kavanagh, a Dublin photographer, has been taking Doortraits of her neighbours at their doors and raising funds for cancer.

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Doors Closed, Hearts Open

Katie Kavanagh, a Dublin 8 based photographer, had an idea. As we’re generally stuck indoors due to COVID-19 restrictions, she’d take portrait shots of her neighbours at their doors. The idea grew legs and she’s linked up with Purple House Cancer Support Centre for the project, Doors Closed, Hearts Open. Their aim is to create a gallery of 200,000 ‘Doortraits’ to support the 200,000 people living with Cancer i

Orla O'Brien of Galz Gone Wild laughing and wearing woolly hat

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Dublin hiking groups – Galz Gone Wild

Hiking for women who want to connect with nature We caught up with Melissa McDermott – Galz Gone Wild founder – and Ruth Farrell to find out about the group of women who escape the city to find some scenic hush in the Wicklow mountains. Creating a supportive community of women Mel founded Galz Gone Wild in 2017 after moving home from London. She found herself lacking direction, and she was unsure of her next step. She started to hike to clear her head, but the hiking communities she found were mostly male and older. They were hiking for different reasons. “There is a community there, but it’s very much about getting from point A to point B, as quick

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Meet A Dubliner – Pat Liddy, Tour Guide

Pat Liddy is many things. An artist, historian, writer, illustrator, broadcaster, mapmaker, and environmental lobbyist who has helped make Dublin a global tourist attraction. The author and illustrator of over seven books on the city, as well as others on Irish cultural sites, he is the operator of Pat Liddy’s Walking Tours of Dublin. I was born and reared in what we might call the inner city, which in this case was Phibsborough. So, in the first place, that qualifies me as a true Dubliner, because the definition is “Born between the canals,” isn’t it? If I wanted to come into t

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The Flower Ladies of Grafton Street

Wrapped from head to toe against the hostile elements, surrounded by a riot of colour which cuts a sharp contrast with the grey February day, meet the flower ladies of Grafton Street. They say the ladies are “the heart and soul of Grafton Street” and what helps save the road from becoming just another English high street. You’ll find the ladies bringing both wit and colour to the corners of Chatham, Harry and Duke Streets. Tina Kelly tells us she’s been selling flowers all her life, starting off aged 12 helping her mother when Grafton St still had two-way traffic. She has seen a lot come and go from her perch on Duke Street. Tina tells Dublin.ie that one time she even met The Duke himself. “Yeah I met John Wayne.” “Sure I met them all,” she adds. “Sean Connery… I was talking away to him, Liam Neeson, Pierce Brosnan, Lisa Stanfield. I met an awful lot of them. And sure Eric Clapton, well I was talking to him on the street for nearly two hours and I hadn’t a clue who he was.” A natural born story teller, you can tell Tina enjoys the banter that comes with the trade. Many of the customers are obviously regulars as there’s lots of first name usage. Sister-in-law Susanne, who mans the Harry Street corner, says “you have to enjoy talking to people.” And in case we hadn’t noticed, she adds: “Now I would be a talker!” The Kelly name is synonymous with flowers on Grafton Street going way back, Susanne says. “Now I married into the Kelly family,” she says adding that she comes from a family of boxers. My grandfather was Spike McCormick.”

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Diversity and unity at George’s Street Arcade

The business owners in George’s Street Arcade are a diverse bunch, coming from the likes of Nepal, Poland, France and Venezuela. We meet some of them to learn about what brought them to one of Dublin’s best markets. How business is done at George’s Street Arcade The much-loved George’s Street Arcade is more than just a quick way to get to Drury Street. It is a living breathing illustration of integration from all over the world, under one uniquely Dublin roof. As Dublin.ie approached the green gates, it noticed an impeccably dressed lady with a blossom i

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The Antique Street

Francis Street is going through some big changes these days, subtle and quiet as they might be. The area is providing a home to new bars, restaurants, and shops. But mostly it’s filled with antique shops, and antiques have been the main business round here for quite a while now. “I opened about 16 years ago,” said Patrick Howard, of Patrick Howard Antiques, “though Francis Street itself has been filled with antique shops for almost 30 years.” Patrick was a fashion designer before he got into the antiques game. “I did that for most of my life, and when I got tired of it I

Sports & Outdoors

a male deer in the phoenix park stands under a tree

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Dublin Treasures – The Phoenix Park Deer

A gang of lads. Shy, reserved, quiet. Just chewing the cud. Sure, every now and again, there is a bit of jostling. Just like you would expect from a group of healthy young males. However, there’s one thing you would not expect. And that’s the complete lack of interest in the women across the way. It’s almost like an old country ballroom. Men on one side. Women on the other. But come September, that will all change. Scents will be donned. Fights will be had. Women will be chased. Another generation will be born. So Park Ranger, Terry Moore, tells Dublin.ie as we cruise through a blustery Phoenix Park in his jeep.

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Lansdowne Road: From old to new

There’s a lot of history at Lansdowne Road. Including the fact that 73,000 pints were sold on a single day match day recently. Dublin.ie stopped over for a visit to learn more. Ireland versus England at Lansdowne Road. One of the great sporting occasions at one of the great sporting arenas. But when these sides first met here, in 1876, it wasn’t rugby they were competing at. It was athletics. We won four events to their nine victories, one of which was the tug of war. The Lansdowne grounds, established by Henry Wallace Dunlop, opened in 1873 and soon provided a home for a brand new rugby club, Lansdowne, of which Dunlop was the founder. But the place als

image of dog strolling through old-fashioned park gate

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Dublin Treasures – Blessington Street Basin

Down by the Secret Garden On the south side, the secret garden was always the Iveagh Gardens. However,  music, comedy and food festivals have taken place there in recent years, meaning that the garden isn’t so secret anymore. These days, to find the city’s true secret garden, you have to head north. Up O’Connell Street, then North Frederick, across Dorset Street and on up Blessington Street until you come to black wrought iron gates. In you go. And you’re there. What to expect at Blessington Street Basin The Blessington Street Basin