Compact and easy to navigate; mild no matter the season; filled with history, energy and opportunity: there are a lot of reasons Dubliners love the Fair City. But if there’s one reason to move here, it has to be the people – we’re some of the friendliest in the world!

History & Society

Dublin’s legacy stretches back over a millennium of history, change and development. The first known settlement here was Áth Cliath, which took its name from a major ford across the tidal River Liffey. Around the sixth century, a monastery named Duiblinn (Irish for ‘blackpool’) was founded, where Vikings eventually arrived. After the Anglo-Norman invasion in 1170, Dublin became the capital of the English Lordship of Ireland and was populated extensively with settlers from England and Wales. The early 16th century was a turbulent time when King Henry VIII’s split with the church led to the closure of monasteries and the destruction of religious institutions with papa

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FAQs about day-to-day life in Dublin

Often, it’s only when you arrive in a new destination that questions about everyday life crop up. Will I need an adaptor to charge my phone? Do I need to bring a raincoat? We’ve rounded up FAQs about life in Dublin to address the queries you didn’t even know you had. What is the Dublin climate like? There’s tons of reasons to live in Dublin. But the weather probably isn’t one of them. Ireland’s climate could be described as mild, moist and changeable. Dublin gets about 730mm (28 inches) of rain a year – more than London or Paris, but less than Copenhagen

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Travelling to Dublin

Although Ireland is an island nation, Dublin is closely connected to the rest of Europe by air and sea – and to the rest of the island by road and rail. Flights from Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels, Berlin and Luxembourg all take two hours or less. While flights coming to Dublin from UK locations like London, Liverpool and Edinburgh are even shorter. Whether you plan to travel for business or pleasure, Dublin is a great base for your journeys. It’s just one of the many perks of living in the city. Getting to Dublin by air In 2019, Dublin Airport was one of the top 20 in Europe for connectiv

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County areas

Dublin city stretches across 115km², with the county itself covering 921km². While it’s not the biggest area, as Ireland’s capital city, it has a lot going on – which is why it’s split into four local authorities: Dublin City Council, Fingal County Council, South Dublin County Council and Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council.

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Dublin neighbourhoods

An introduction to the districts of Dublin The River Liffey flows through the centre of Dublin dividing it in two. Traditionally, the north side of the river was home to the city’s working class residents, while the south side was associated with Dublin’s middle and upper classes. However, this is changing as neighbourhoods like Smithfield, Stoneybatter and Clontarf to the north become gentrified. Today, the county would be more accurately described as having a west-east division. Although there isn’t any river drawing a line between the two areas, the east side of Dublin is generally considered to be more affluent – particularly along the coast.

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