Organising flights, wrapping things up at home, saying goodbye to friends and family. It’s a big ask to move for work. Thankfully, moving to Dublin is relatively straightforward. This brief guide looks at immigration requirements, assessing your new salary and opening a bank account, registering for tax and social security, and transferring your qualifications.

Recognising your qualifications

Your qualifications from home may not be immediately recognised by Irish employers and educational institutions. Looking for work is difficult enough without being thwarted by incompatible qualifications, so it’s important that employers can understand your hard-won credentials. Thankfully, there’s a process in place to help you compare your qualifications with the Irish equivalent. NARIC Ireland holds a database of over one thousand qualifications issued by institutions from around the world. Simply search the database, find your qualification and see how it compares to I

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Employment Law

You’ve moved to Dublin, settled into your new home and found a job. How can you be sure that you’re being treated fairly? Ireland’s employment law is transparent and applicable to all workplaces. Here are a few resources that will help you check that your boss is on the level. The Workplace Relations Commission The Workplace Relations Commission (WRC) is your one-stop-shop for your rights at work. It publishes a comprehensive Guide to Employme

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Unemployment benefits

You’ve moved all the way to Ireland to work. You’ve set yourself up, put the kids into school, and made a host of financial commitments – electricity bills, phone contracts and rental agreements. Then you lose your job. What do you do? It’s not the end of the road. Even if you are not an Irish citizen, you have rights and entitlements that can help you stay on your feet while you fix your situation. Staying in Ireland EEA & Swiss Nationals First of all, you can stay. If you are an EEA or Swiss national, you can stay in Ireland, unemployed and looking for work. Non-EEA nationals If you a non-EEA national, you can sta

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Bank Accounts and Tax

Your guide to setting up a bank account and becoming a tax payer in Ireland. You’ll need an Irish bank account to receive your pay. It isn’t difficult, but you will have to be in the country to do it – most Irish banks will want to speak to you in person before they open an account for you.

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