While hitting the books is an important part of getting your degree, college life really begins outside the classroom. Dublin’s third-level campuses are abuzz with exciting societies, events and social opportunities.

Life on campus for the international student

Ireland might be a small country, but our universities, institutes of technologies and colleges are incredibly diverse. Every year, tens of thousands of students from over 130 countries come here to study. Dublin, home to about 1.2 million people – and growing – is the destination of choice for the majority. Drawn by the city’s high-quality education offering and the possibility of securing a part-time job in one of the major tech firms with a Dublin base, including Google and Am

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This Land is Your Land, this Land is Ireland

Dublin was never on Anna Grimard’s trajectory. Now, an MSc in Marketing, a red-haired fiancé and a managerial role with an award-winning Irish travel company later, she tells us all about what Liffeyside life has to offer. Originally from Florida, it took a while – and a hint from Hollywood – before Anna ended up crossing the Atlantic. “I did my undergrad in advertising in Georgia, in the States, so I was in Atlanta for three years. When I left, I kinda moved around a bit… I ended up in Tennessee, working at a children’s non-profit museum, which was super fun – but I was so obsessed then with getting something in advertising.” At the time, jobs in her fiel

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Ed Giansante & eDublin – A local guide for Brazilians

Ed Giansante left Sao Paulo for Dublin in 2008 with the hope of learning English and making a new start in Ireland. He lived with a host family in a Dublin suburb and went to an English language school near Mountjoy Square. His timing was both good and bad. Ireland’s economy had hit a massive recession, and the country was facing into a period of austerity. It would be hard for a native to survive in the capital under such conditions, let alone a non-English speaker. He found work with Stratogen, an advertising agency, where he worked for 18 months. “I was making hardly any money, because of the recession, but I had a job. That was really important in so many wa

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Dublin’s most unusual student clubs & socs

Anyone for capoeira? Fancy an evening of food and drink? Or how about spending time with some serious Harry Potter fans? Universities and colleges in Dublin have a strange and eclectic mix of student clubs and societies. Yes, there’s soccer and GAA, but what about caving & potholing or sepak takraw, a type of kick volleyball? Yes, drama and debating are to be expected, but did you know that you can also join student societies with a focus on comedy, animation or meditation? Sam Blanckensee graduated from UCD last year. In his final year, he founded the

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What’s different about Dublin?

Every year, tens of thousands of people from over 130 countries come to study in Ireland’s universities, institutes of technology and colleges. What’s bringing them here and why are they choosing Ireland? Sheila Power is director of the Irish Council for International Students. She points out that overall statistics for the number of international students are hard to pin down, but says that we need to broaden the conversation out. Ireland is an attractive destination for international students because it is perceived as friendly and safe “Ireland is an attractive destination for in

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The LGBTQ student experience in Dublin

Dublin is a friendly and welcoming place for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBTQ) students. Third-levels all have LGBTQ societies, while the city’s bars, restaurants and clubs are welcoming spaces. Dublin.ie spoke to three LGBTQ students about their experience of the city. Growing up gay or bisexual can be tough. Being a young transgender person can be even harder. But in recent years, Ireland has come on in leaps and bounds. Organisations like youth support group BeLonGTo and the Transgender Equality Network Ireland (Teni)

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The Third Level: From Vermont to Dublin

Ireland has the second highest percentage of people with a third level degree in Europe. Whether it’s family tradition, student life or affordable fees in comparison to our counterparts, our third level system is highly popular. It’s also enticing a lot of international students to the country. Ben Campbell-Rosbrook is originally from Syracuse in upstate New York but has come to Ireland to do his master’s in Trinity College. ‘I’m spending like half or a third of the fees to do my masters here, compared to America’, notes Ben. ‘I think a lot of students in America get the sense that the system is stacked against them.

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The Third Level: Life at Trinity Medical

Medicine in Trinity College is known as one of the most difficult courses to get into in Ireland. These students will play a major role in the future of healthcare, in Ireland and worldwide. Someday your life might just depend on one. During placement at hospital, some of these students will experience things that most of us will never see. They’ll witness life-changing moments and hear about difficult upbringings and tragic back- stories. “Sometimes I’ve taken a step back and thought, oh I’m very lucky to never have had any of those issues” says Aisling Hickey, a Trinity medicine student. Aisling is currently in fourth year of the course and on placement.

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