Dublin has a hugely talented and diverse workforce across a range of industries. These are their stories.

sean bryan of cut & sew sit on a barber chair with his arms folded

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Cutting A Fine Figure: The success of Cut & Sew

Barbershop culture is on the rise in Dublin. Barbershops are becoming cultural hotspots. Places you can go not only for a haircut, but for music, design or even a whiskey. By taking the best of New York’s barbershops and adding a touch of creativity and an Irish welcome, Sean Bryan of Cut & Sew has built his business from one chair in the basement of a record shop to four stores around Dublin city. And he isn’t finished yet. Dublin.ie caught up with Sean to hear about the story behind his success. Starting Cut & Sew barbers Sean left school after third year and started a carpentry apprenticeship. However, that didn’t work out, so he turned his h

photo of stained glass inspired ox painting on camden street

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Creative Dublin: James Earley, Street Artist

Adding colour to walls all across Dublin, James Earley is bringing street art out of its sub-cultured roots. By spray painting concepts onto walls, Earley is proving that street art is more than just stylistic. Dublin.ie sat down for a chat with him to find out more. He tells us about his family’s artistic heritage and how he got started painting street art in Dublin. In conversation with James Earley During my teens I started getting interested in sub-culture, the likes of skating, basically anti-establishment stuff and I was looking at the graphics in the skate magazines. I lived out by Dún Laoghaire and was getting

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How Dublin Works: The Guinness Enterprise Centre

The Guinness Enterprise Centre, on Taylor’s Lane in the heart of Dublin’s Liberties, is managed by Dublin Business Innovation Centre and has been named the no.1 university associated business incubation centre in the world. In the first of two articles about the GEC, Dublin.ie talks to Eamonn Sayers, the centre’s manager since 2011. Dublin.ie: I’m an entrepreneur. I’ve got an idea. What can the GEC do for me here? Eamonn Sayers: The first step here is that we’ll try and put you in front of an entrepreneur who’s in the same industry. We’ll say have a chat with this person, see what they’re thinking. If you’ve identified your target market, again we’ll say we know someone here who’s in the same market and they’ll have a coffee with you too. Dublin.ie: Then what happens? Eamonn Sayers: Our role here is to help your company grow and scale. We help to make it become better and we help to make you a better entrepreneur. We create an environment and a community and a sense of belonging that makes entrepreneurs very comfortable, makes them enjoy the fact that this is their office, this is their workplace, so that both the entrepreneur and their teams are in the best place to grow their businesses.

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Look What’s Popping Up: Fumbally Exchange

It’s been going on for a while. You might call it a movement - a revolution of sorts – but it’s certainly a good idea. It’s the pop-up. Pop-up shops and pop-up spaces have become an increasingly common sight. At Dublin.ie, we wanted to know more. First things first: they don’t go pop, and they’re not inflatable. The term pop-up can cover a lot. But in essence, we’re talking artists, designers and businesses getting the chance to make use of premises they wouldn’t otherwise have access to – all those shops and work spaces that closed during the recession because their tenants couldn’t afford the rent anymore.

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Seven Stories of Creativity – Anne O’ Mahony, The Dressmaker

We all know Grand Canal as the home of Google but unbeknownst to many, tucked among the tech giants is a building where ancient crafts are still practised, THE DESIGN TOWER. The Tower’s seven stories of studios play host to jewellers, fashion designers, conservationists and more. After meeting Violinmaker, Michiel De Hoog Dublin.ie revisited the Tower and met Dressmaker Anne O’ Mahony. Anne O’ Mahony creates made-to-measure pieces as well as costumes for film and theatre, including The Gat

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How Dublin Works: Jam Art Factory

Dublin.ie talks to Mark Haybyrne of Jam Art Factory about his family business and the future of Irish art and design. Since 2011 brothers Mark and John Haybyrne have been showcasing the best of contemporary Irish art and design in their store, Jam Art Factory. Stocking a range of Irish art and design they give independent artists – such as illustrator Claudine O’Sullivan, Arty Smarty Jewellery and KaroArt Ceramics - a platform to exhibit and sell their work. Having started in the Liberties, they now have another thriving store in Temple Bar and ship internationally from jamartfactory.com.

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Seven Stories Of Creativity – Michiel DeHoog, The Violinmaker

We all know Grand Canal as the home of Google but unbeknownst to many, tucked among the tech giants is a building where ancient crafts are still practised, The Design Tower. The Tower’s seven stories of studios play host to jewellers, fashion designers, conservationists and more. The Tower started its life as a sugar refinery in 1862. In 1978 the IDA bought the Tower to form part of their Enterprise Centre with the aim of preserving and restoring it to create a home for many of Dublin’s craftspeople. Today this enterprise is managed by Trinity College. Dublin.ie is going behind the tower walls and

a close up shot of the fish and seafood

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How Dublin Works: George’s Fish Shop

Ever wondered what it would be like to be your own boss? Graham Rogerson did. After several years doing shift work in IT, he was ready for a change. Relaunching George’s Fish Shop One thing that got him thinking about opening a shop was that he’d get to meet people. “And that didn’t really happen much in IT,” he remembers. The question ‘what sort of a shop?’ was a bit of a no-brainer. Graham is a member of a family with sea water coursing through its veins. His grandfather James and James’s brothers had their own fishing boats. Before they were 12 years old, Graham’s father, George, and his uncle, Tommy, were selling fish on

a close up of prawns on toast in haute cuisine style

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Dublin Food Chain: Supporting local businesses

Attention Dubliners: we’re incredibly lucky to inhabit a city with such foodie inclinations and a culinary largesse. Right now, Dublin offers an exquisite blend of Michelin-starred fare, outstanding street food, hipster eateries and friendly local restaurants. And let’s not forget the evolution of our drink culture either. We were once a city of avowed tea drinkers and pint lovers; we’re now as au fait with cocktails and customised artisan coffee blends as any seasoned mixologist or barista – and loving them. We’ve also fully embraced the juicing phenomenon, but still find time for a cuppa. Or three.

nubi kayode raises his arms as he speaks on stage

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Meet a Dubliner – Nubi Kayode, Entrepreneur

Nubi Kayode – or Nubi Kay – was only planning to come to Dublin for his studies. However, after arriving in 2013, jobs with leading companies in the city’s tech sector kept him here. After gaining experience at both Accenture and Stripe, he is now the Startup Programmes Lead at Paystack – which was acquired by Stripe for $200 million back in 2020. Now, he’s working with African startups – as he always intended. During his time in Dublin, Derek O’Connor at Dublin.ie sat down with Nubi to find out about his experience in the city. In convers

The Fumbally

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How Dublin Works: The Fumbally

A Q&A with The Fumbally Café We visit The Fumbally Café on Fumbally Lane to speak with founder, Aisling Rogerson, about her experience of working at the busy community coffee shop. What is The Fumbally? It’s a popular Dublin 8 neighbourhood café where the emphasis is on all things wholesome, healthy, ethical and delicious. They’re experimental too, making their own fermented drinks. Then, there’s also The Stables – their complementary event space where yoga classes, food workshops and other cultural happenings take place. It also houses an extra kitchen where the café’s chefs can play around with new di

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How Dublin Works: Chloé Roux, Airbnb

“You’re always fine-tuning so it’s always challenging; you’re always looking for improvements, no matter what they are, small ones or bigger ones” The Job: Airbnb: the online community marketplace that has transformed the way we book our holiday accommodation. We Irish have taken to the notion of renting out our houses, apartments and spare rooms to visiting folk particularly well, with the number of Dublin hosts growing at somewhat furious rate. Who she is: Chloé Roux, a project manager with Airbnb in Dublin. Originally from Lebanon, she did her