The bricks and mortar of Dublin’s streets provide the stage to what is a truly great city, a city built on hundreds of years of history and culture. But to find the heart of Dublin you must look to the people who call it their home. Both new and old Dubliners alike bring the city to life. The warmth, the welcome and the wit applied to daily life have made Dubliners known the world over and truly make it one of the best places to live in.

Dublin takes pride in its rich history and culture. With its ancient past, Dublin is built upon a collage of the generations which have come before us. From Vikings to Georgians you will find their ideas imprinted upon the city’s DNA. However, today Dublin’s heart beats with a vigour brought by the many cultures that reside within it. We are a truly global city, and while walking around our streets you will hear the many languages of a new Dublin. These new influences and adopted voices now play a role in defining the multi-faceted culture which resides in Dublin today.

Through this mixture of new and old you will find a Dublin which has grown into the cosmopolitan and vibrant city it is today; a city proud of its rich past but continuously striving towards the future.

Creative & Cultural City

“When I die Dublin will be written in my heart”, a line which captures Dublin’s affinity with creativity and written by one of the city’s much celebrated cultural greats, James Joyce. Dublin cannot be fully explained without the use of an artist’s brush or a writer’s pen. Some of the world’s greatest writers, musicians, playwrights, and artists have called this unique city their home and it’s streets and their many characters have been their muses, immortalised in some of the most famous pieces of literature known to the world. Packed full of imagination, walking around Dublin you will find that our city has become a canvas for its citizens. Creativity is etched upo

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History

Dublin is a city steeped in cultural significance and hosts some of Ireland’s finest national treasures including the Book of Kells and the fine cathedrals of Christ Church and St Patrick’s. Dublin’s medieval streetscape is faithfully preserved around Temple Bar, where it provides the backdrop to a vibrant cultural quarter. Stretches of the City’s walls can still be found in Wood Quay and at St Audoen’s Arch. The first known settlement was Áth Cliath, which took its name from a major ford across the tidal River Liffey. Around the sixth century a monastery Duiblinn (Irish for ‘blackpool’) was founded due south of the tidal pool in the River Poddle, a tributary of the

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New Music Dublin 2017

National Concert Hall

The National Concert Hall is delighted to announce the programme for New Music Dublin 2017: a partnership between RTÉ, the National Concert Hall and The Arts Council / An Chomhairle Ealaíon. Planned in consultation with internationally-acclaimed composer, conductor and pianist Thomas Adès, the vibrant festival, which takes place between Thursday 2nd and Saturday 4th March 2017, will see Adès conduct the RTÉ Concert Orchestra for the Irish concert-performance premiere of a new opera by Gerald Barry, Alice’s Adventures Under Ground, recently co-commissioned by the Barbican, Britten Sin

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Fink and Dublin 8

For more than fifteen years, Fink has been painting walls. In an interview with Dublin Inquirer last year, he talked about his influences and his history in the field of street art. It seems Dublin 8 is something of a stomping ground, and walking around the area last weekend three bits of his work caught my eye. Firstly, behind the Vicar Street venue, is this great little tribute to Mr.James Kearney, the Saint Stephen’s Green park keeper who famously fed the ducks of the park during the Easter Rising.Kearney left his lodge twice daily during the insurrection, and made his way to the artificial lake. He thankfully survived the week, though six of his beloved ducks were not as fortunate.

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Story Bud?

'How The Irish Speak English', celebrating Irish slang & phrases. In this instance, Dubliners.

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