Living

15 minutes… on O’Connell Bridge

Stand in one spot for long enough and you get to witness some pretty interesting stuff. The ground rumbles beneath my feet with the Luas works and its accompanying symphony of pneumatic drills and heavy machinery, played expertly by men in high vis jackets and hard hats. Lorries laden with cement and rubble pass left and right. Double decker after double decker stream from the quays onto the bridge. The middle-aged woman weighed down with Arnott’s bags runs past me for the stop, panting. Her bus is pulling away. She’s distraught. Maybe she has some sentimental link to that particular bus; another one with the same number is waiting at the lights on O’Connell Street, a minut

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There’s a plan to ‘rebrand’ the north inner city as ‘Dublin’s North Central Quarter’

Dublin's Sheriff Street area is set to get a facelift and be “rebranded”. As part of the government’s new initiative to boost the Dublin’s north inner city, the area is to get a €5 million funding injection. A report, drafted by Kieran Mulvey, formerly of the Workplace Relations Commission, aims to turn the area, which is just a stone’s throw from some of the multi-national banks and businesses in the IFSC, from a “run down, no-go” area to a “modern and attractive” place for people to work and live. What’s in the plan? There are commitments for there to be no signs of dereliction, with good street lighting, trees and greenery. In order to achieve this, calls for establishing a ‘Docklands Tax’ appear to have made some impact. Novel ways to eradicate derelict sites are to be explored, including the possibility of a levy on unused sites in the area, as well as dedicated contributions from Nama, IFSC businesses and the Central Bank (which is due to open in the region soon). A combined contribution of €10 million over a three-year period to a “renewal fund” would revitalise the urban landscape, said Mulvey. While there are calls for more social housing in the area, the report highlights five areas for large-scale infrastructure investment:

THEJOURNAL.IE

Audi Dublin International Film Festival

Various Locations

The Audi Dublin International Film Festival is Ireland's biggest celebration of Irish and International Feature Film. The festival takes place each year in Spring and in 2012 showed over 140 of the very best films from 30 countries worldwide. As well as a jam packed program of film, the festival presents a wide array of movie events ranging from the glitz and glamour of the red carpet to outdoor cinema installations that take place right across the city to industry masterclasses.

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Supernatural Dublin – Marsh’s Library

This library has more than just books as residents… Marsh’s library is located behind Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. It’s Ireland’s oldest public library. Inside, the library is, for the most part, untouched, remaining beautiful. Marsh’s Library is one of the very few 18th century buildings left in Dublin that is still being used for its original purpose. It’s made up of two long galleries, joined by a small reading room. Books are shelved in bays on either side of the gallery. The interior of the library has elegant dark oak bookcases filled with old books. Bookcases are complete with rolling ladders and walking through the gallery almost feels like a journey throu

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Alltech Craft Brews & Food Fair

The Convention Centre

Looking for craft brews, great food, live music and just a bit of craic? Join us at the 5th Alltech Craft Brews and Food Fair, Ireland’s largest craft beer festival! Enjoy the latest craft beers, ciders and spirits. Be entertained by up-and-coming, home-grown musical talent, enjoy Six Nations rugby and tempt your taste buds with delicious artisan food. All under one roof! Thursday, 23rd February: 5pm – 11pm Friday, 24th February: 5pm – 11pm Saturday, 25th February: 12.30pm – 11pm

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Getting Around

As with any city, you’ve got options for getting around Dublin. You can hop aboard a Dublin Bus with an extensive network reaching across the county. There’s a coastal train line, the DART, which stops at seaside towns from Greystones in the south to Malahide and Howth in the north. There’s a light rail system, the LUAS, with the Green Line heading south from the city to Bride’s Glen (work on an upgrade is in progress) and the Red Line heading west to Saggart. Dublinbikes, the most successful citywide bike hire scheme in Europe, is loved by the locals. Beyond that there’s plenty of taxis, or you can hire a car. Leap Card The integrated public transport ticket

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What's On

Jericho

Bewley’s Café Theatre

Bewley’s Café Theatre @ Powerscourt Townhouse is proud to present an original new work made especially for our lunchtime audience by MALAPROP Theatre…  All we're saying is: IF the universe has a moral arc, which way was it bending during the millions of years when cyanobacteria were the major players? This is a show about the world we live in, and have always lived in, and always will live in. It's about bad things happening that a lot of people think are good things (and vice versa). It's also about wrestling, journalism, and treating entertainment like its politics (and vic

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Hound’s Hotel & Madhouse – Double Bill

Smock Alley Theatre

Hound's Hotel - Head Above Water Theatre Company Frequented by wealthy and sophisticated, yet somewhat extraordinary patrons, Le Château du Chien is the most exclusive and luxurious hotel in all of the the Swiss Alps. The coveted peace within its wondrous walls is however troubled by the arrival of an unexpected and rather hairy guest. Blood ensues... Written by: Conor Duffy Directed by: Conor Duffy + Angelene Milne Cast: Conor Duffy, Jordan Begley, Conor Hanley, Gavin O’Connor Duffy, Nathalie Clement, Elizabeth Ann Doyle, Warren Hanley, Luke Collins, Angelene Milne Lighting

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Pride and Prejudice

Mill Theatre

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is one of the most beloved works in literature and this lively stage adaptation features all the sparkling wit and romance of the great novel. Sparks fly when spirited Elizabeth Bennet meets single, rich and proud Mr. Darcy. But Mr. Darcy reluctantly finds himself with a woman beneath his class. Can each overcome their own pride and prejudice? Balally Players bring a large talented ensemble cast to this lavish, witty and romantic drama featuring some of the best loved Austen characters and maybe even a dance or two! Adaptation by Mary Keith Medbery

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    James Gandon, architect and builder of the Customs House, the Four Courts and other Dublin buildings, is born in London #OTD 1742 https://t.co/pCc6PdZGbb

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    Registration for the 2017 Dublin Race Series is now open! One Event €20, Two Events €35, Three Events €50 & Three Events + Marathon €115 🏃🏼🏅 https://t.co/hZ0k7KLFUe

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    Watch “Seamus Murphy at The Little Museum of Dublin” on #Vimeo Exhibit ends 26th Feb --> https://t.co/Au9Y7JMkqV

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Our Articles

15 minutes… on O’Connell Bridge

Stand in one spot for long enough and you get to witness some pretty interesting stuff. The ground rumbles beneath my feet with the Luas works and its accompanying symphony of pneumatic drills and heavy machinery, played expertly by men in high vis jackets and hard hats. Lorries laden with cement and rubble pass left and right. Double decker after double decker stream from the quays onto the bridge. The middle-aged woman weighed down with Arnott’s bags runs past me for the stop, panting. Her bus is pulling away. She’s distraught. Maybe she has some sentimental link to that particular bus; another one with the same number is waiting at the lights on O’Connell Street, a minut

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Dublin Uncovered: Fairview

Fairview has been a part of suburban Dublin since the 1800s. In the beginning it was a refuge for well-off people seeking solace from the bustling city. The area originally bore the same name as neighbouring Ballybough. But in 1856 a church was dedicated to Our Lady of Fair View, giving the surrounding area the name used today. Walk through Fairview and you’ll feel its unique vibe. It’s like a cross between the Liberties and Clontarf. Trendy bars and eateries sit comfortably alongside hardware stores and charity shops that have been here for years. Families who have been in the area for generations live happily alongside a metropolitan mix of young professionals.

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Joyce’s Dublin Puzzle

In James Joyce’s most famous work ‘Ulysses’, Leopold Bloom quips that a good puzzle would be to cross Dublin without passing a pub. Clever ad man that he is, Bloom is always coming up with brilliant ideas and this is another: the world’s first anti-pub crawl. The puzzle stumped Dubliners for years. Until 2011 when it was solved by software developer Rory McCann. Six years on Dublin.ie decided to check out the route to see if it’s still pub-free. But before we got started, we wanted to talk to an expert – preferably someone who’d done the route before. We f

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Dublin Treasures – Sweny’s Pharmacy

Sweny’s – The worst pharmacy in the city Tucked away on Lincoln place, in the heart of Dublin’s south inner city, is Sweny’s pharmacy. It was made famous by the James Joyce novel, Ulysses. Sweny’s is no longer a working pharmacy, but a key part of Dublin’s culture and nostalgia. It’s run by volunteers to maintain its original 1850’s Victorian style – made obvious by the mahogany counter and old glass cabinets outlining the room. Shelves of unopened medicine bottles and old photographs sit in the cabinets, still waiting to be collected. The original chemists sign is still intact, proving that this place has not lost its charm!

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Dublin Treasures – Hodges Figgis

Hodges Figgis is Ireland’s oldest bookshop, celebrating its 250th birthday in 2018. This iconic store has moved around a lot since its founding in 1768, from Skinners Row, to Nassau Street and on to Dawson Street. But it has always been home for Dublin’s booklovers. We spoke to Bookstore Manager, Tony Hayes to get to the bottom of what makes Dublin’s oldest bookshop a Dublin Treasure. Tony has worked in the book trade since the ‘70s and has in recent years returned to Hodges Figgis. Hodges Figgis’ iconic storefront would not look out of place in J.K. Rowling’s Diagon Alley and the magic doesn’t

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Becoming Men

During a long hot summer in inner city Dublin, a man looks back on his own youth

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