Living

St Patrick’s Festival – A city en fête

There is a tendency, when you’re Irish, to take the celebrations of Saint Patrick’s Day for granted – until you spend it somewhere else. Last year, I was working in London’s Canary Wharf for Saint Patrick’s Day. Looking out the window of a fifteenth floor office, the only break of green in the glass and steel metropolis was some hastily painted inaccurate shamrocks on the windows of an empty pub across the street. With n’er a silly hat in sight, I was never more Irish than I was that day in London, listening to Raglan Road in my cubicle. Growing up, Saint Patrick’s Day was the day to break Lent and crack open the sweet jar, a day for your

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Dublin by Lamplight

The Abbey Theatre

Abbey Theatre presents The Corn Exchange’s much loved alternative version of the founding of a national theatre. Amidst the filth and fury of Dublin 1904, the theatrical event of the century is about to explode! Fading stars, rebels, whores and romantics irreverently expose the strange and lurid world of Dublin by Lamplight. An instant hit when it first opened in 2004, this hugely entertaining and anarchic production is a night to change a nation’s destiny! Unless it all goes horribly wrong…. ‘Awesome perfection… funny, clever, strange and thoughtful’ - The Irish Times

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Dublin in Blue

“There’s always been a bit of an audience for Blues in Dublin” On a dark Wednesday evening you walk into the Leeson Lounge on Upper Leeson Street. It’s a great place to take refuge from the rain, the cold, or whatever is on your mind. You grab a stool and a pint. Some musicians are playing. At first you don’t take any notice. Then something happens: your left foot starts tapping. Some of the songs feel old, or of a different time, but here there’s new life being given to them. Very soon it’s hard to take your eyes from the stage. The band is Los Paradiso, and the music they’re playing is the

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Five Lamps Arts Festival 2017

Dublin North Inner City

The Five Lamps Arts Festival is a creative encounter at the heart of an inner-city community. It takes place every spring in Dublin, Ireland’s capital city. The mission of the festival is to promote community development and social inclusion through the arts and to showcase the uniqueness of this geographic area to residents and to visitors. The geographic location of the Festival centres around the ‘Five Lamps’ – a decorated lamp post with five lanterns dating from around 1880. The Five Lamps stand on an island at the junction of Portland Row, North Strand Road, Seville Place, Amie

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New Fiction – read an extract from Slipping by John Toomey

We're delighted to present an extract from Slipping, the latest novel from John Toomey, author of Sleepwalker and Huddleston Road. About Slipping: Glimpsing his own cosmic insignifigance, Albert Jackson sets out to reclaim a life unlived, and in so doing commits an unspeakable crime. Incarcerated, and in correspondence with a local novelist, he struggles to maintain control of his story. Dressed, I turned my shoulder to the audience of the mirror. Nice, I thought. Lean legs, the shoeshined glint of my black shoes. I patted my stomach, taut and spare, and permitted my reflection a satisfied smile. Tidy enough. Well-preserved. And that’s none too shabby at forty-nine. I have not fallen to slovenliness, as most men do. At ten and a half stone and half an inch below six foot, there are worse than me.

RTE.IE

People & Culture

The bricks and mortar of Dublin’s streets provide the stage to what is a truly great city, a city built on hundreds of years of history and culture. But to find the heart of Dublin you must look to the people who call it their home. Both new and old Dubliners alike bring the city to life. The warmth, the welcome and the wit applied to daily life have made Dubliners known the world over and truly make it one of the best places to live in. Dublin takes pride in its rich history and culture. With its ancient past, Dublin is built upon a collage of the generations which have come before us. From Vikings to Georgians you will find their ideas imprinted upon the city’s DNA. However,

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What's On

Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye

Pavilion Theatre

“We don’t live in a Republic - we live in an economy.” Jim Nolan’s new play, Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye is a funny and richly entertaining, topical and provocative reflection on the Easter Rising Centenary Commemoration. Following its world premiere at Garter Lane Theatre in 2016, the play tours nationwide this spring (March and April) opening in Waterford (birthplace of writer Jim Nolan) on March 20 and playing at 9 venues nationwide until April 8. Set in a provincial newspaper office in the Irish Midlands in the run up to Easter 2016, the privately-owned Inishshannon Chronicle

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Five Lamps Arts Festival 2017

Dublin North Inner City

The Five Lamps Arts Festival is a creative encounter at the heart of an inner-city community. It takes place every spring in Dublin, Ireland’s capital city. The mission of the festival is to promote community development and social inclusion through the arts and to showcase the uniqueness of this geographic area to residents and to visitors. The geographic location of the Festival centres around the ‘Five Lamps’ – a decorated lamp post with five lanterns dating from around 1880. The Five Lamps stand on an island at the junction of Portland Row, North Strand Road, Seville Place, Amie

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Falling Out Of Standing

Festival House

Falling Out Of Standing is the visual art legacy set in film and the next stage to ANU & CoisCéim’s award-winning production These Rooms by artists David Bolger, Owen Boss and Louise Lowe. In 2016, These Rooms cross pollinated dance, theatre and visual art to thrust audiences into the events of one hundred years and explored the 1916 rebellion through the eyes of civilians at the moment when the uninvited rising invaded their homes in North King Street with devastating consequences in a work that investigated questions of dignity, belonging and dispossession. Set in 1966, the 50th

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Twitter

  • RealDublinBuzz Dublin Buzz
    (@RealDublinBuzz)

    .@IFI_Dub Presents Sounds of Silents this April | Dublin Buzz https://t.co/fweuQISTIt https://t.co/5sfEMgfFsd

  • glasnevinmuseum Glasnevin Museum
    (@glasnevinmuseum)

    This #Easter, take one of our 1916 Rising Tours #Glasnevin https://t.co/LaQHdwSG56 #LoveDublin https://t.co/2lA2a9d1RP

  • CostiganSarah Sarah Costigan
    (@CostiganSarah)

    Thank you to the @JamesJoyceCentr for warmly welcoming some of our @dublinmuseum members in for such a lovely visit this week https://t.co/c2UjDCia8S

  • OldDublinTown Old DublinTown. com
    (@OldDublinTown)

    Temple Bar 1900s #LoveDublin @Failte_Ireland @CelticCanada @EBEikeland @vsmith1660 @TheClarence @dublinmuseum @LoveTempleBar #Meitheal2017 https://t.co/lLBmJ0cugY

  • DublinOne Dublin One
    (@DublinOne)

    Making plans for the weekend? The Ha'penny Market @TGSDublin takes place from 12pm-6pm every Saturday. You'd never know what you'd find! https://t.co/4JWnPbBKMF

  • NLIreland Nat Library Ireland
    (@NLIreland)

    85 Upper Dorset Street, where playwright Seán O'Casey was born John Casey on 28 March 1880. https://t.co/W73ENsP51J

Our Articles

Is Northside/Southside still a thing?

Remember when whether you lived on the Northside or the Southside of Dublin was a really big deal? Like, practically life-or-death? No? Well then either you’re not originally from around these parts, or you moved around in circles that never saw you encountering anyone from the other side of the Liffey. God forbid. So how deep did this, this rivalry we could call it, go? Well, think of it like this – there are those who would refuse to go to Dunne’s Stores in the Stephen’s Green Shopping Centre if they hadn’t got the slippers they were after in Dunne’s Stores over in the Ilac. We’re talking garlic-to-a-vampire type of aversion here. The side of the Liffey on

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The Flower Ladies of Grafton Street

Wrapped from head to toe against the hostile elements, surrounded by a riot of colour which cuts a sharp contrast with the grey February day, meet the flower ladies of Grafton Street. They say the ladies are “the heart and soul of Grafton Street” and what helps save the road from becoming just another English high street. You’ll find the ladies bringing both wit and colour to the corners of Chatham, Harry and Duke Streets. Tina Kelly tells us she’s been selling flowers all her life, starting off aged 12 helping her mother when Grafton St still had two-way traffic. She has seen a lot come and go from her perch on Duke Street. Tina tells Dublin.ie that one time she even met The Duke himself. “Yeah I met John Wayne.” “Sure I met them all,” she adds. “Sean Connery… I was talking away to him, Liam Neeson, Pierce Brosnan, Lisa Stanfield. I met an awful lot of them. And sure Eric Clapton, well I was talking to him on the street for nearly two hours and I hadn’t a clue who he was.” A natural born story teller, you can tell Tina enjoys the banter that comes with the trade. Many of the customers are obviously regulars as there’s lots of first name usage. Sister-in-law Susanne, who mans the Harry Street corner, says “you have to enjoy talking to people.” And in case we hadn’t noticed, she adds: “Now I would be a talker!” The Kelly name is synonymous with flowers on Grafton Street going way back, Susanne says. “Now I married into the Kelly family,” she says adding that she comes from a family of boxers. My grandfather was Spike McCormick.”

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15 minutes… on O’Connell Bridge

Stand in one spot for long enough and you get to witness some pretty interesting stuff. The ground rumbles beneath my feet with the Luas works and its accompanying symphony of pneumatic drills and heavy machinery, played expertly by men in high vis jackets and hard hats. Lorries laden with cement and rubble pass left and right. Double decker after double decker stream from the quays onto the bridge. The middle-aged woman weighed down with Arnott’s bags runs past me for the stop, panting. Her bus is pulling away. She’s distraught. Maybe she has some sentimental link to that particular bus; another one with the same number is waiting at the lights on O’Connell Street, a minut

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Dublin Treasures – Sweny’s Pharmacy

The people, places and things that make Dublin special. Tucked away on Lincoln place, in the heart of Dublin’s south inner city, is Sweny’s pharmacy. It was made famous by the James Joyce novel, Ulysses. Sweny’s is no longer a working pharmacy, but a key part of Dublin’s culture and nostalgia. It’s run by volunteers to maintain its original 1850’s Victorian style – made obvious by the mahogany counter and old glass cabinets outlining the room. Shelves of unopened medicine bottles and old photographs sit in the cabinets, still waiting to be collected. The original chemists sign is still intact, proving that this place has not lost its charm!

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Freedom of the City

Remember where the fairy tale of Little Red Riding Hood took place? Or Hansel & Gretel? Well, these days, it’s not stories of the deep, dark woods parents try to spook their children with, but the bright lights of the city. Maybe they’re afraid of them growing up too quick, of venturing out into the big wide world. It’s all futile, however, because for a kid reared out in the suburbs, the ambition always is to be able to go into town one day, sans parents. It was interesting speaking to one such teen, Eric, now at the ripe old age of 16, to see how much has changed and how much has stayed the same. He recalled with us he and his friends’ first excursion, and ex

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Becoming Men

During a long hot summer in inner city Dublin, a man looks back on his own youth

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