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Féile Nasc Folk and Traditional Music Festival

Marlay Park

Féile Nasc will take place in Marlay Park on Saturday, 25th of May 2019. The festival will showcase some of the best Folk and Traditional Music acts in an awesome setting! Féile Nasc will give a platform to Irish folk and traditional music in Dublin. Those in attendance will celebrate together the special role played by our music in creating a bond between the people of Ireland and beyond. There will be a special emphasis on showcasing local musicians as well as more well-known national artists. Féile Nasc will be run on an eco-friendly basis with all vendors committing to the use of

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Ireland’s Eye

A 15 minute boat ride from Howth on Dublin’s northside lies Ireland’s Eye, a beautiful and mostly untouched island. The only signs of human activity are two structures: a Martello Tower and the ruins of a church. It’s a hive of activity otherwise; the wildlife on offer is incredible, notably the many species of nesting birds. The most spectacular natural feature is the huge freestanding rock called “the Stack”, at the northeastern corner of the island, which plays host to a large variety of seabirds, including thousands of guillemots, razorbills, fulmars and gulls. There’s even a few breeding pairs of puffins. Grey seals are abundant in the sea around the isla

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International Literature Festival Dublin

Citywide

International Literature Festival Dublin, founded in 1998, is Ireland's premier literary event and gathers the finest writers in the world to debate, provoke, delight and enthral. Described by the press as 'boasting a stunning array of top international literary talent' and 'the country's most successful and easily the best annual literary event', ILF Dublin's line-up is sure to impress. Attracting visitors from around the world annually, the festival is a destination for those who wish to celebrates the very best of Irish and international talent. With readings, discussions, debates,works

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Dublin Treasures – The GPO

On one count at least, the GPO is a disappointment to its visitors. ‘People come in looking for a big green post box. it’s a bit of let-down when I tell them there isn’t one’, says security guard David, who’s from Peckham but has Irish roots. In place of the single green box you might have expected, there are two magnificent brass-and-mahogany receptacles for your letters, one labelled ‘Dublin only’, the other ‘All other places’. Careful observation of the postman who collects the letters from these would suggest, however, that whether you put your letter in the one or the other, it’ll end up in the same bag: not everything is quite as it seems at the General Post Office.

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WHAT'S ON

Amélie The Musical

Gaiety Theatre

The stunning Broadway Musical, Amélie, based on the French film, has its Irish première this May. Amélie is the story of an astonishing young woman who lives quietly in the world, but loudly in her mind. She secretly improvises small, but extraordinary acts of kindness that bring happiness to those around her. But when a chance at love comes her way, Amélie realises that to find her own contentment she'll have to risk everything and say what's in her heart. Amélie is a new musical based on the much loved five-time Oscar®-nominated film, and an 'enchanting act of theatrical reinvent

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Castleknock Music Festival

St. Brigid's Church of Ireland

Supported by Fingal County Council, the 2019 Castleknock Music Festival will bring leading Irish and International musicians to Castleknock to play for the public in its main venue, St.Brigid’s Church. A key element of the 2019 programme will be the introduction of the junior competitions and master-classes with the renowned musicians to the festival's programme Classical, Jazz, Romance and various contemporary music styles will all be represented at the Castleknock Music Festival and will give its audience the chance to hear the works of eminent Irish composers. By incorporating the com

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The Magic Flute

Gaiety Theatre

The Magic Flute, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Irish National Opera with the Irish Chamber Orchestra under Peter Whelan. Mozart's enchanting final opera. His most popular stage work. A timeless moral tale in a world of clashing cultures. "In The Magic Flute he [Mozart] miraculously combines a new simplicity with great seriousness and comedy" — Viking Opera Guide.

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Our Articles

Dublin Uncovered: Phibsboro

Wanton quirkiness, perennial liveliness and an endearing touch of shabbiness have always been part of Phibsboro's innate appeal. It was where I wanted to live as a DCU student in the late nineties, instead of the gentler, more refined environs of Drumcondra where I was instead. Phibsborough was where the cool kids hung out, with an ice rink, a surfeit of charity shops and good pubs like The Hut, where the Johnny Cash Appreciation Society were in situ on a Sunday night. And then there was McGowan's, where young love was almost certainly guaranteed to bloom, especially after a few drinks.

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Dublin Treasures – The Canals

Mentions of Dublin’s Canals, both the Royal and the Grand, pour aplenty through Irish poetry and song. To each canal, a poet’s statue: The Royal has Brendan Behan, turned to look at you if you sit beside him; Patrick Kavanagh is on the Grand Canal, arms crossed and pensive. To each canal, a lyric: the passionate ‘Auld Triangle’ for the Royal; the contemplative ‘Canal Bank Walk’ for the Grand.

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Dublin Uncovered: Capel Street

You may not know it, but Capel Street is one of Dublin’s most historically significant streets. It was a fundamental part of an extension of the city north of the river by Sir Humphrey Jervis, who built a large chunk of his estate around St. Mary’s Abbey. In 1676 he built Essex Bridge, (now Grattan Bridge) establishing Capel Street as one of the main links between the north and south of the city. A great contrast to the Capel Street of today, in the 17th and 18th Centuries it was residential, lined with freestanding mansions, each of which had large gardens and courtyards. Later on in the 18th Century t

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Dublin Uncovered: Fairview

Fairview has been a part of suburban Dublin since the 1800s. In the beginning it was a refuge for well-off people seeking solace from the bustling city. The area originally bore the same name as neighbouring Ballybough. But in 1856 a church was dedicated to Our Lady of Fair View, giving the surrounding area the name used today. Walk through Fairview and you’ll feel its unique vibe. It’s like a cross between the Liberties and Clontarf. Trendy bars and eateries sit comfortably alongside hardware stores and charity shops that have been here for years. Families who have been in the area for generations live happily alongside a metropolitan mix of young professionals.

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Dublin Treasures – Phil Lynott’s Statue

In a random (and completely unscientific) study I asked several people to name five of the best known statues in Dublin. Merrion Square’s Oscar Wilde was name checked, as was Patrick Kavanagh’s canal bank sit‐down. Some confusion reigned as to where Molly Malone had been repositioned from Grafton Street (she now wheels her wheelbarrow on Suffolk Street) but each and every person questioned mentioned the iconic bronze statue of rock star Phil Lynott, who left us for the great stage in the sky 33 years ago ‐ January 4th, 1986, to be precise. While the immortalisations of Daniel O’Connell, James Connolly, Charles Stewart Parnell or James Larkin went unmentioned in our (again to be stressed, unscientific) poll, one might take this as less of a lack of interest in Dublin’s political history, and more of an indication as to the special place the Thin Lizzy frontman continues to hold in Dubliners’ hearts. A poet and a rocker, the Brummie‐born lead singer and bassist, who grew up in Crumlin, remains one of the city’s most beloved sons.

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Bloomsday - James Joyce

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