Learning

World-class teacher: Luke O’Neill, immunologist

As Professor Luke O’Neill discovered recently, when you become a fellow of the extremely exclusive and august science club that is the Royal Society, you have to sign their book. Previous signatories include Newton, Boyle, Freud and Einstein (Oh, and superstar astrophysicist Brian Cox). Which makes the process rather nerve-wracking, according to O’Neill, a biochemist at Dublin’s Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute and one of the world’s leading immunologists. Luke O’Neill: There’s a practice, you don’t want to smudge your name! Dublin.ie: That’s quite some company you’re keeping there - but what do all you science guys have in common? Luke O’Neill: Science is trying to find stuff out. You can call it exploration, you can call it pioneering, frontier stuff because it’s all about making discoveries. We are explorers, that’s our job, that’s what attracted me to it. I wanted to see something nobody’s seen before. And in my case, luckily enough in my lab we probably had three big discoveries that made a big difference: we explored the immune system and saw things there for the first time. The next step is there’s a whole new pathway or process discovered - and of course the thrill would be if that was a dysfunction or a disease because then you might try and correct it. Once you find the enemy, you might be able to design a new medicine that might beat it. Dublin.ie: So you’re a biochemist and not an ordinary one? Luke O’Neill: I’m a bit of a schizophrenic! I was interested in chemistry anyway and biochemistry is chemistry writ large: if you want to understand something you’ve got to understand the chemical basis for things - and biochemistry is the basis for life. If we understand the chemicals of life wouldn’t that be a thrilling thing? One comparison is with genetics: geneticists don’t really go beyond the genes, you know – and I want to know the real fundamentals. Like genes makes proteins, but what do they do? I was always obsessed with true mechanism – the underlying mechanism, the very basics of how things work. I’ve always been obsessed with molecular things in a sense.

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Documenting Jazz

DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama

The first jazz conference in Ireland will take place at the Dublin Institute of Technology, Conservatory of Music and Drama, Rathmines. Since it was first named, jazz has been a phenomenon of mass-distributed sound, word and image. While its vernacular origins and emphasis on improvisation give primacy to live performance, the consumption of jazz is largely mediated through documentation of some form. This process of documentation has arguably been just as important as, and in some ways more important, than ‘the music itself’, shaping its reception and spread throughout the world. In

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NCAD: Bringing Art to the City’s Heart

Art College is a waste of time, right? Not so: The National College of Art & Design is really punching above its weight and is intent on disproving the lazy stereotypes about art students. Its annual showcase has become an art and design highlight in the city, featuring painting, product design, sculpture, fashion and more. Meanwhile, its fashion students have been awarded top prizes both here and abroad and the college is climbing the QS world college rankings. Luncheonette, their basement café, happens to be one of the best lunch spots in the city, and it’s open to the general public. And the students bring

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100 Year Anniversary of the First Dáil Éireann in the Mansion House

Mansion House

As part of the 100th Anniversary of the sitting of the First Dáil in the Mansion House on the 21st of January 1919, the Mansion House will be open to the public for three days: Fri: 10am - 8.30pm Sat: 10am - 5pm - The Lord Mayor's Coach will be on view on the forecourt until 4pm. Sun: 10am - 5pm The 'First Dáil' of 1919. This Dáil was an assembly established by Sinn Féin MPs elected to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in the 1918 United Kingdom general election. Upon winning a majority of Irish seats in the election (many uncontested), Sinn Féin MPs refused to r

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WHAT'S ON

IADT Open Day

IADT

Come along to the IADT Open Days - explore the campus and find out more about the fantastic courses on offer. Talk to lecturers and students to see why they chose IADT. From full-time undergraduate and postgraduate programmes to accredited part time courses, IADT has earned the reputation as Ireland's leading creative cultural and technological institute by consistently providing innovative, practical and relevant courses. Gain insight into courses at IADT with our series of talks covering everything from the portfolio guidelines to career prospects and campus life. Take a campus tour du

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UCD Architecture, Landscape Architecture and City Planning & Environmental Policy Open Day

UCD

The School of Architecture, Planning and Environmental Policy at UCD will open its doors to students who are interested in studying Architecture, Landscape Architecture or City Planning & Environmental Policy at UCD. Architecture, Landscape Architecture, City Planning & Environmental Policy lie at the heart of innovation and development. If the combination of art and science inspires you, and you are interested in designing buildings or planning the outdoor environment, then degree programmes will unleash your creative potential. The open day will take place at the Richview studi

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TU Dublin - Tallaght Campus | Open Evening

IT Tallaght

TU Dublin - Tallaght Campus -  invites those who are interested in part time courses, final year secondary school students, mature applicants and Guidance Counsellors to their Open Evening. One of the best ways to learn about our new Technological University Dublin is to come to our Open Events. You will be able to gain a real insight into the academic programmes, careers, plans for the campus and life at TU Dublin.

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Our Articles

Parlez-vous Pirate?

There’s a lot of things you can learn at your local library. And how to speak Pirate is one of them. As a place to learn a foreign language, Dublin’s public libraries have a notable advantage over the city’s other estimable language-learning institutions – the facilities they offer are free! Aside from the foreign language books you can borrow, your library card gives you access to two other invaluable resources. One is a language app called Mango. The other is the more traditional but by no means outmoded method of improving your French, or your Mandarin; con

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The Lilliput Press

On a quiet corner in Stoneybatter, behind a quaint but unassuming shopfront lies renowned Dublin publishing house, Lilliput Press. The door is wide open when I arrive, and the sunshine falls in on a room lined with bookshelves. Two men sit on a sofa by the window, leaning over a coffee table covered in books. The door of founder Antony Farrell’s office sits ajar, and inside there is the busyness of a thoroughly active office; heaped manuscripts, teetering book stacks, handwritten letters taped to the wall. After he ensures I have a coffee and a bit of fruit to snack on, I sit on a chair in amongst the chaos of the heaving room. Antony sits behind his desk, peeling a mand

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The Royal Irish Academy

The Royal Irish Academy has been located at 19 Dawson Street since 1851 when it moved from its Grafton Street origins to the more spacious Academy House. Sandwiched between Saint Anne’s Church and the Mansion House, you have probably walked past its elegant exterior hundreds of times and assumed that whatever happens inside has nothing to do with you. But the Academy wants you to know that it has. Pauric Dempsey, the Head of Communications, meets me in reception and leads me up the cold back staircase of the building to the staff offices. “There’s a touch of upstairs-downstairs to this bit,” he laughs. He explains to me what being a member of the Academy is all abo

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International Students at Maynooth University

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