Seven Stories of Creativity – Tony O’Connor, The Jeweller

We all know Grand Canal as the home of Google but unbeknownst to many, tucked among the tech giants is a building where ancient crafts are still practised, THE DESIGN TOWER. The Tower’s seven stories of studios play host to jewellers, fashion designers, conservationists and more. Dublin.ie is going behind the tower’s walls to meet the craftspeople working there, including Tony O’Connor of JewelleryRepair.ie. I’ve been here longer than my own house. I started my apprenticeship here in a different jewellery company

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How Dublin works: Nobó

Dublin company Nobó launched its ‘Frozen Goodness’ dairy-free and gluten-free ice cream four years ago. It’s gathered a bunch of prestigious awards since then and is distributed nationwide in Ireland. You’ll also find it in stores across the UK – and in Waitrose in the Dubai Mall. Dublin.ie talked to the husband and wife team behind the brand, Rachel and Brian Nolan. Dublin.ie: Nobó isn’t some marketing gimmick, is it? It’s a real innovation. Rachel: Definitely it is in terms of the ingredients. There are other dairy-free ice-cr

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Cutting A Fine Figure

From one chair to three shops – the success of Cut & Sew Barbershop culture is on the rise in Dublin. Barbershops are becoming cultural hotspots. Places you can go not only for a haircut, but for music, design or even a whiskey. By taking the best of New York’s barbershops and adding a touch of creativity and an Irish welcome, Sean Bryan of Cut & Sew has built his business from one chair in the basement of a record shop to three stores in Dublin’s city centre. And he isn’t finished yet. Dublin.ie caught up with Sean to see what’s behind his success. Sean left school after

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Talking business

You’re the HR manager at a Dublin-based corporate. Your new hire has everything you need. Well, nearly everything. All they lack is the conversational English they’ll need for you to get the best out of them. Which is a pity – because that vital project starts in two weeks’ time. You need to talk to Salvatore Fanara and Rosanna Fiorenza of Travelling Languages. But first, romance. He was an engineer from southern Sicily. She was a banker from Turin. It was 2006. Salvatore: We met in Turin a few weeks before we moved to Ireland. Rosanna: He told me that he was planning to go somewhere to improve his English. Salvatore: We were looking to do something different, to make a big change. Rosanna: I decided: look, I’ll quit my job, we’ll pack and we’ll go. Salvatore: London, Dublin, Edinburgh…? In the end we just packed the car and we drove from Turin to Dublin. Rosanna: I worked in banks for another 7 years here. But I‘d had enough of banking, finance, I wanted to change, I wanted to do something else. So we brainstormed. Salvatore: I remember thinking that if I wanted to scale up my own working life I really needed to get up to speed properly from a language perspective with someone who’s not Italian. The starting point was when we realized that a lot of people weren’t satisfied in terms of the results they were getting from traditional language programmes: we’d identified a gap in the market. Rosanna: We came up with the idea for Travelling Languages in 2011 and I finally quit my job in 2013.

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Creative Dublin: James Earley, Street Artist

Adding colour to the walls across Dublin, James Earley is bringing street art out of its sub-cultured roots. By spray painting concepts onto walls, Earley is proving that street art is more than just stylistic. Dublin.ie: How do you feel street artists are perceived? James Earley: Some people have this idea that as a street artist, you could be stand-offish, but that’s not the case at all. The majority of us are very open and want to get people involved. I’ve met a lot of people when I’m working on walls in the city, asking ‘will ya put my name on it’ or ‘can I have a go’ – they’re gas craic! I used to d

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How Dublin Works: The Guinness Enterprise Centre

The Guinness Enterprise Centre, on Taylor’s Lane in the heart of Dublin’s Liberties, is managed by Dublin Business Innovation Centre and has been named the no.1 university associated business incubation centre in the world. In the first of two articles about the GEC, Dublin.ie talks to Eamonn Sayers, the centre’s manager since 2011. Dublin.ie: I’m an entrepreneur. I’ve got an idea. What can the GEC do for me here? Eamonn Sayers: The first step here is that we’ll try and put you in front of an entrepreneur who’s in the same industry. We’ll say have a chat with this person, see what they’re thinking. If you’ve identified your target market, again we’ll say we know someone here who’s in the same market and they’ll have a coffee with you too. Dublin.ie: Then what happens? Eamonn Sayers: Our role here is to help your company grow and scale. We help to make it become better and we help to make you a better entrepreneur. We create an environment and a community and a sense of belonging that makes entrepreneurs very comfortable, makes them enjoy the fact that this is their office, this is their workplace, so that both the entrepreneur and their teams are in the best place to grow their businesses.

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The Guinness Ladies and Hoggers

Guinness has long been part of Dublin’s history and it’s not just the drinking of the black stuff that we’re talking about either. There’s all the industry and activity that surrounds its brewing and its distribution too – and all the memories that are associated with them. Up to 1961, for instance, the barges transporting wooden casks of Guinness along the Liffey would have been a familiar sight. In those days, of course, the Liffey did more than just divide the city in two. It was a major thoroughfare as well. There were six Guinness barges, each named after a Dublin suburban locality: Castleknock, Killiney, Sandyford, Howth, Clonsilla and Seapoint. The bargeme

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Stallholders of George’s Street Arcade

George’s Street Arcade is Ireland’s first purpose-built shopping centre, and one of Europe’s oldest, having been built in 1881. We popped in to talk to a few of the stallholders. Milo Póil, Man of Aran Fudge I’m here in the Arcade just over two years, my third Christmas! I am the son of The Man of Aran Fudge! It’s my dad who makes all this stuff, he’s being doing it for 20 years now. It’s actually a family recipe. It’s my Grandmother’s recipe, well, the tiger butter flavour anyway. That recipe was made 90+ years ago with only a few changes! This is one of the only permanent stalls of ours. We’ve another on Ínis Óirr, which is

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Look What’s Popping Up: Fumbally Exchange

It’s been going on for a while. You might call it a movement - a revolution of sorts – but it’s certainly a good idea. It’s the pop-up. Pop-up shops and pop-up spaces have become an increasingly common sight. At Dublin.ie, we wanted to know more. First things first: they don’t go pop, and they’re not inflatable. The term pop-up can cover a lot. But in essence, we’re talking artists, designers and businesses getting the chance to make use of premises they wouldn’t otherwise have access to – all those shops and work spaces that closed during the recession because their tenants couldn’t afford the rent anymore.

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Meet a Dubliner – Ciaran Butler, Smithfield Market Trader

I’m up at four in the morning. The first thirty years are the hardest! After that you’re just up and out. I tippy-toe out the door so I don’t wake the family. I’ve worked six days a week here for thirty years. My father worked here too. I love it. There’s nowhere else in the city that is alive like this market at five o’clock in the morning. It’s bustling with characters, it’s got a heartbeat of its own at that time of the morning. And that’s uplifting. There’s a good bunch of lads there. They’ll stand shoulder to shoulder with you. We’re working under stressful conditions. This morning was two degrees. There was frost on the window, it was bloody freezing - that’s when the character comes out. I’ve got five layers on today. That’s for two degrees. You want to see minus two!

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Dublin Flea Christmas Market

The Dublin Flea Christmas Market is heading back for a third year in a row at The Point Village. From Thursday December 7th to Sunday December 10th the shopping centre will be transformed into a winter wonderland filled with over 100 stalls selling the flea market’s usual retro and vintage wares alongside Irish craft and design. Once again, the market is supported by Dublin City Council and Dublin.ie. We sat down with half of the four-person team behind Dublin Flea, Sharon Greene and Dave Dunn to find out what makes the Christmas Flea Market so special.

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Seven Stories of Creativity – Anne O’ Mahony, The Dressmaker

We all know Grand Canal as the home of Google but unbeknownst to many, tucked among the tech giants is a building where ancient crafts are still practised, THE DESIGN TOWER. The Tower’s seven stories of studios play host to jewellers, fashion designers, conservationists and more. After meeting Violinmaker, Michiel De Hoog Dublin.ie revisited the Tower and met Dressmaker Anne O’ Mahony. Anne O’ Mahony creates made-to-measure pieces as well as costumes for film and theatre, including The Gate’s recent pr

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