Meet the Dublin Honey Project

I first came across The Dublin Honey Project in a local cafe on Leonard’s Corner. Stacked in a little pyramid were half-pound jars, each bearing bold lettering that denoted which postcode in the city they hailed from. In ascending order, D1, D4, D6, D7, D9, D14 and finally, the somewhat more ambiguous ‘Co. Dublin’. But it wasn’t just the lettering on the beautiful packaging that was different; they each seemed to have their own individual colour and hue, so I concluded they probably tasted a little different, too. I would never find out. By the time I’d consumed the jar of honey from my own postcode, the cafe had completely sold out, and they wouldn’t be back in stock until the following year.

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Sprouting up

There are literally hundreds of young entrepreneurs launching their start-ups in Dublin, hoping to climb the precarious ladder in the tech, food and pharma sectors. Many of these companies will go on to achieve greatness; some will be quietly successful, others will become well-known names across the globe. Others, sadly, will perish under the immense pressure of starting and running a company from scratch. Dublin.ie caught up with Jack Kirwan (pictured above right), founder and co-owner of Sprout & Co. restaurants, which are, well, sprouting up all over the city, to find out what it takes to get from that init

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Meet a Dubliner – Joseph Kinvi, APNI co-founder

I moved to Ireland from Togo back in 2005, when I was 15 years old. I studied accounting and finance in DIT and then went on to train as a chartered accountant with EY. Last year was busy for me: I was one of the founder members of the African Professional Network of Ireland and I took a big leap out of the corporate world to move into a start-up. The Economic and Social Research Institute has shown that black African people have a more difficult time finding jobs, and are more likely to experience workplace discrimination. APNI is an important way of addressing this: if you know someone working in an

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Meet a Dubliner – Matthew Toman, Producer

I didn’t really like school that much. I’m dyslexic and I couldn’t handle it. I hated even reading at the time. I left school when I was 16 and got into a trade in air conditioning and refrigeration. I bought my first house when I was 19, my second when I was 22, my third when I was about 24. I rented out the houses and was involved in different businesses, investing money as well as working in refrigeration. In my early 20s, I had nice cars, everything was going great, I travelled all over the world and had a ball! I realised I liked the hustle and bustle behind the camera. It was being creative but it was still business, and I like dealing with people

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How Dublin Works: Eoin Redmond, Foreman

This is no occupation for old men – to twist what Yeats said. Wouldn’t mind but I’m not even that ancient. Climbing up all these flights of scaffolding. Then the scaffolding gives way to ladders. Ladders for a couple more floors. So the sweat is breaking out when we get up here: this windswept top floor with stunning views – if it was safe to stop watching your footing and look out on the city and the Liffey flowing into Dublin Bay.

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Welcome Home

The Irish diaspora is renowned around the globe. Our ex-patriots exert a powerful influence on how this small country is seen by the rest of the world – and in 2017, the last year for which figures are available, 30,800 people left home to join it. But hang on: in the same period about 27,400 returned to Ireland – a marked increase over the previous year. So why, all of a sudden, are we seeing a return of the Irish? Everyone has different reason for coming home, of course. We talked to Natasha, 25, about what prompted her return to Dublin after almost three years of travelling. I feel like your early 20s are precious for either of two different route

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The Newspaper Vendor

4pm. O’Connell St. And it sounds like a Beckett play. Doom and gloom. Sitting and waiting. Waiting. Waiting for customers. “I suppose a fella gets to sit and read the paper all day. That’s what it’s come to,” says Austin Cregan, the third generation of his family to sell papers and magazines on the capital’s main street. Sitting in his kiosk near the Abbey St corner, Austin reaches behind him and takes out a laminated 2008 article from the Irish Times. It’s all about him and his father’s and grandfather’s life selling newspapers from the kiosk. “Read that,” he says to Dublin.ie. “Everything is in that. Excep

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Going it Alone

What happens when you choose the road less travelled and forgo a full-time college course on leaving school? We chat to Craig Andrew about what he did instead. The Leaving Cert can seem like the biggest thing in the world when you’re 18. It’s going to define the rest of your life. You’ve got to work hard if you want a job. You’ve got to work even harder if you want a well-paid job. And you’re just lucky if you enjoy it. That’s how Craig Andrew and many others felt when they were that tender age. “It’s not like I didn’t try,” Craig says. “But nothing really spoke to me that much. So I applied for stuff I thought was relevant, with help from guidance co

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Run This Town: Traffic Control

The eyes of the city: Andrew Harris, Dublin’s traffic control room supervisor. ‘There’s always someone looking at you’ sang Dublin band the Boomtown Rats in 1979. Today in the city that someone is Andrew Harris and his staff at the Traffic Control Room. They monitor the screens in their room in Wood Quay, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. They’ve got 300-odd cameras in locations all over the city – with forty more on the way. Some of them you can see – up at the top of street lights, for instance. But it’s the ones you can’t se

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Creative Dublin: The Design House

Half way down Dawson Street, nestled away in an old Georgian building, is the Design House – a thriving hub of creativity. The Design House was founded by Irish fashion designer, Bebhinn Flood. It’s the creative home to several in-house designers. With design and retail under the one roof, it’s like buying straight from the studios. The hallways host a gallery of art. Over 60 designers, mostly Irish, sell their creations here. Cutting-edge fashion, jewellery, bridal, vintage and a variety of crafts all in the one beautiful Georgian building. Not to mention the authentic Italian café in the basement, which has just

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Creative Dublin: Fuchsia MacAree, Illustrator

Dublin based illustrator Fuchsia MacAree has a range of work full of unusual characters, bright colours and quirky maps. She’s been freelancing since finishing college, working with a regular client base, taking on bigger projects and teaching part-time in NCAD. Dublin.ie sat down for a chat to find out more. Dublin.ie: How did you get into illustration? Fuchsia MacAree (FM): I’m from Killaloe originally. I studied Visual Communications in NCAD. I thought I wanted to do graphic design, then outside of college, I was illustrating for local magazines. I realised, illustration didn

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Vintage at The Harlequin

Dublin’s vintage scene is thriving. With more vintage stores opening in the city centre, the competition is hotting-up, but so is the demand. So, why the sudden increase in vintage fashion? The inclusion of vintage inspirations by current fashion designers and the media has driven a change in people’s attitudes towards wearing second-hand clothes. You could say the recession has had an impact too. People are more resourceful because of it. They’re more likely to buy second hand now and generally the clothes are longer lasting than high street fashion. There’s also the fact that, thanks to a recent surge in bohemian and hipster trends, Dubliners are striving for mor

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