MART for Art’s Sake

One of Rathmines’ smallest buildings happens to be one of the most distinctive, for it houses a Dublin art collective, MART. The old fire-station, with a classic engine-red door facing the main street, was built in 1847 soon after Rathmines became an independent “township”. Like the magnificent Rathmines Town Hall, the station was a symbol of township independence and civic pride. The fire crew based here played a big role battling the inferno, which blazed around Sackville Street during the

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Artists in Residence

Dublin’s art scene is blossoming. A new wing has opened up in the National Gallery, IMMA continues to attract international work, the walls of the city are awash with commissioned street art but with a competitive housing market and rising rents, how is the city looking after its artists? Each year, Dublin City Council puts out a call for artists to live in the four subsidised residential spaces offered for periods of three months to a year; two cottages in leafy tranquil Albert College Park in Glasnevin, a Temple Bar apartment and St Patrick’s Lodge beside the

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Seven Stories of Creativity – Elizabeth O’Kane, Sculptor

We all know Grand Canal as the home of Google but unbeknownst to many, tucked among the tech giants is a building where ancient crafts are still practised, The Design Tower. The Tower’s seven stories of studios play host to jewellers, fashion designers, conservationists and more. In the fourth instalment in our series exploring The Design Tower, Dublin.ie meets sculptor and painter Elizabeth O’Kane to talk about her path to art, her craft and the building itself. I always wanted to be an artist but I went to quite an academic school in Northern Ireland. I completely messed up my art paper and thoug

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How Dublin Works: Sharing in Creativity

In recent years, Dublin has lost some of its most important creative spaces to a building boom that’s reminiscent of the Celtic Tiger era. Block T in Smithfield and South Studios near Cork Street were both closed down in 2016 with a significant loss of square footage for artists, photographers, designers and writers. In their place, however, a new generation of co-working spaces – aimed specifically at servicing Dublin’s creative communities – is coming into being. Although they have become abundant in many European capitals in the last few years, co-working spaces are a relatively new arrival in the Dublin property market. In the past 12 months the number

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Meet a Dubliner – Ailbhe Keane, Izzy Wheels

When Izzy was little she always said that her favourite thing about being in a wheelchair was that her shoes never got dirty. They looked brand new every day and the lights never ran out in her favourite light-up runners. However, her real shoes were her wheels. I remember we used to decorate her wheelchair for birthday parties and Halloween. We filled them with fresh flowers once when she was a flower girl for a wedding. At Christmas, we used to put tinfoil and lights around the wheels and lots of tiny Christmas decorations for the Xmas family show.

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The Typewriter Shop

On Dorset Street in Dublin’s north inner city there’s a typewriter shop that’s been there as long as I can remember. Founded in 1983, it’s run by Joe Millar and his son, who’s also named Joe. It’s the last typewriter shop in Dublin and the only one in the Golden Pages where it’s listed, simply, as ‘The Typewriter Shop’. Before setting up the shop, Joe Sr had worked in the typewriter trade for the American manufacturer Remington: “they had offices in Dublin, Belfast, Cork, Galway and Limerick”. They sold typewriters to offices, and serviced the machines to keep them i

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Space Engagers

If you live in Dublin, it’s almost impossible not to be aware of the shortage of affordable housing. If you haven’t joined the back of a long queue to view a property in recent years, chances are you know a lot of people that have. And for many the consequences can be far worse; about 140 people sleep rough every night, there are some 3,000 homeless who are dependent on hotels and B&Bs, and a further 100,000 are on social housing waiting lists. It’s something that’s garnered a lot of media & governmental attention, and often the solutions proffered are quite grandiose; build up and build quickly. As a nation, we tend to have a penchant for the new when it comes to housing. While that may be a part of the solution, it’s certainly not the only approach. In every corner of this city, there are spaces going to waste.

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Dublin Voices: Towards 2050

I came over to Dublin from Edinburgh in 2005. I suppose it was bang in the middle of the good times. Back then, the atmosphere here was insane; there was so much going on, it was so busy. Ireland and Dublin were really riding the wave at that time. Employment was high, everyone was well paid, everyone had nice cars, you could get a loan if you wanted. Then we moved into hard times, and it’s changed a lot in that regard now. I think people are more grounded; there’s a sense of reality now. I don’t think the ordinary man is as tempted to get carried away. People are more concerned with value and being sensible. I think that’s a positive that can be taken out of the recession.

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The Flower Factory

The bedding in your local park, the roundabout at the end of your road, the planter on the quays: Dublin’s famous for its bursts of floral colour. Any journey you make in the city is likely to take you past some cheery display. But did you know that every plant you see comes from a single nursery, lovingly grown from seed to flower? St. Anne’s Park on the northside of the city is an embarrassment of riches. Its the second largest public park in the Dublin area, the grounds of the former estate of Lord and Lady

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Meet the Dublin Honey Project

I first came across The Dublin Honey Project in a local cafe on Leonard’s Corner. Stacked in a little pyramid were half-pound jars, each bearing bold lettering that denoted which postcode in the city they hailed from. In ascending order, D1, D4, D6, D7, D9, D14 and finally, the somewhat more ambiguous ‘Co. Dublin’. But it wasn’t just the lettering on the beautiful packaging that was different; they each seemed to have their own individual colour and hue, so I concluded they probably tasted a little different, too. I would never find out. By the time I’d consumed the jar of honey from my own postcode, the cafe had completely sold out, and they wouldn’t be back in stock until the following year.

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Creative Dublin: Niall McCormack, Commercial Artist

Graphic designer Niall McCormack has been interested in record sleeve design since he was a child. In the nineties, he began to design record sleeves for his friends’ bands, and for his own band, Jubilee Allstars. He’s now designed over a hundred record sleeves and CD covers for an array of record labels in the UK and USA. So, in co-curating Green Sleeves, an exhibition of Irish record sleeve design in the National Print Museum with Dr Ciar

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Sprouting up

There are literally hundreds of young entrepreneurs launching their start-ups in Dublin, hoping to climb the precarious ladder in the tech, food and pharma sectors. Many of these companies will go on to achieve greatness; some will be quietly successful, others will become well-known names across the globe. Others, sadly, will perish under the immense pressure of starting and running a company from scratch. Dublin.ie caught up with Jack Kirwan (pictured above right), founder and co-owner of Sprout & Co. restaurants, which are, well, sprouting up all over the city, to find out what it takes to get from that init

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Meet a Dubliner – Joseph Kinvi, APNI co-founder

I moved to Ireland from Togo back in 2005, when I was 15 years old. I studied accounting and finance in DIT and then went on to train as a chartered accountant with EY. Last year was busy for me: I was one of the founder members of the African Professional Network of Ireland and I took a big leap out of the corporate world to move into a start-up. The Economic and Social Research Institute has shown that black African people have a more difficult time finding jobs, and are more likely to experience workplace discrimination. APNI is an important way of addressing this: if you know someone working in an organisation, i

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Meet a Dubliner – Matthew Toman, Producer

I didn’t really like school that much. I’m dyslexic and I couldn’t handle it. I hated even reading at the time. I left school when I was 16 and got into a trade in air conditioning and refrigeration. I bought my first house when I was 19, my second when I was 22, my third when I was about 24. I rented out the houses and was involved in different businesses, investing money as well as working in refrigeration. In my early 20s, I had nice cars, everything was going great, I travelled all over the world and had a ball! I realised I liked the hustle and bustle behind the camera. It was being creative but it was still business, and I like dealing with people

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How Dublin Works: Eoin Redmond, Foreman

This is no occupation for old men – to twist what Yeats said. Wouldn’t mind but I’m not even that ancient. Climbing up all these flights of scaffolding. Then the scaffolding gives way to ladders. Ladders for a couple more floors. So the sweat is breaking out when we get up here: this windswept top floor with stunning views – if it was safe to stop watching your footing and look out on the city and the Liffey flowing into Dublin Bay.

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Welcome Home

The Irish diaspora is renowned around the globe. It’s a powerful influence on how this small country is seen by the rest of the world – and last year approximately 32,000 Irish people left home to join it. But hang on: in the same period about 21,000 returned to Ireland – that’s an increase of 74% over the previous year. So why, all of a sudden, are we seeing a return of the Irish? Everyone has different reason for coming home, of course. We talked to Natasha, 25, about what prompted her return to Dublin after almost three years of travelling. I feel like your early 20s are precious for either of two different routes: travelling and explo

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The Newspaper Vendor

4pm. O’Connell St. And it sounds like a Beckett play. Doom and gloom. Sitting and waiting. Waiting. Waiting for customers. “I suppose a fella gets to sit and read the paper all day. That’s what it’s come to,” says Austin Cregan, the third generation of his family to sell papers and magazines on the capital’s main street. Sitting in his kiosk near the Abbey St corner, Austin reaches behind him and takes out a laminated 2008 article from the Irish Times. It’s all about him and his father’s and grandfather’s life selling newspapers from the kiosk. “Read that,” he says to Dublin.ie. “Everything is in that. Excep

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Going it Alone

What happens when you choose the road less travelled and forgo a full-time college course on leaving school? We chat to Craig Andrew about what he did instead. The Leaving Cert can seem like the biggest thing in the world when you’re 18. It’s going to define the rest of your life. You’ve got to work hard if you want a job. You’ve got to work even harder if you want a well-paid job. And you’re just lucky if you enjoy it. That’s how Craig Andrew and many others felt when they were that tender age. “It’s not like I didn’t try,” Craig says. “But nothing really spoke to me that much. So I applied for stuff I thought was relevant, with help from guidance co

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Run This Town: Traffic Control

The eyes of the city: Andrew Harris, Dublin’s traffic control room supervisor. ‘There’s always someone looking at you’ sang Dublin band the Boomtown Rats in 1979. Today in the city that someone is Andrew Harris and his staff at the Traffic Control Room. They monitor the screens in their room in Wood Quay, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. They’ve got 300-odd cameras in locations all over the city – with forty more on the way. Some of them you can see – up at the top of street lights, for instance. But it’s the ones you can’t se

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Creative Dublin: The Design House

Half way down Dawson Street, nestled away in an old Georgian building, is the Design House – a thriving hub of creativity. The Design House was founded by Irish fashion designer, Bebhinn Flood. It’s the creative home to several in-house designers. With design and retail under the one roof, it’s like buying straight from the studios. The hallways host a gallery of art. Over 60 designers, mostly Irish, sell their creations here. Cutting-edge fashion, jewellery, bridal, vintage and a variety of crafts all in the one beautiful Georgian building. Not to mention the authentic Italian café in the basement, which has just

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Creative Dublin: Fuchsia MacAree, Illustrator

Dublin based illustrator Fuchsia MacAree has a range of work full of unusual characters, bright colours and quirky maps. She’s been freelancing since finishing college, working with a regular client base, taking on bigger projects and teaching part-time in NCAD. Dublin.ie sat down for a chat to find out more. Dublin.ie: How did you get into illustration? Fuchsia MacAree (FM): I’m from Killaloe originally. I studied Visual Communications in NCAD. I thought I wanted to do graphic design, then outside of college, I was illustrating for local magazines. I realised, illustration didn

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Vintage at The Harlequin

Dublin’s vintage scene is thriving. With more vintage stores opening in the city centre, the competition is hotting-up, but so is the demand. So, why the sudden increase in vintage fashion? The inclusion of vintage inspirations by current fashion designers and the media has driven a change in people’s attitudes towards wearing second-hand clothes. You could say the recession has had an impact too. People are more resourceful because of it. They’re more likely to buy second hand now and generally the clothes are longer lasting than high street fashion. There’s also the fact that, thanks to a recent surge in bohemian and hipster trends, Dubliners are striving for mor

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Seven Stories of Creativity – Tony O’Connor, The Jeweller

We all know Grand Canal as the home of Google but unbeknownst to many, tucked among the tech giants is a building where ancient crafts are still practised, THE DESIGN TOWER. The Tower’s seven stories of studios play host to jewellers, fashion designers, conservationists and more. Dublin.ie is going behind the tower’s walls to meet the craftspeople working there, including Tony O’Connor of JewelleryRepair.ie. I’ve been here longer than my own house. I started my apprenticeship here in a different jewellery company. They went and I stayed on. So, I

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How Dublin works: Nobó

Dublin company Nobó launched its ‘Frozen Goodness’ dairy-free and gluten-free ice cream four years ago. It’s gathered a bunch of prestigious awards since then and is distributed nationwide in Ireland. You’ll also find it in stores across the UK – and in Waitrose in the Dubai Mall. Dublin.ie talked to the husband and wife team behind the brand, Rachel and Brian Nolan. Dublin.ie: Nobó isn’t some marketing gimmick, is it? It’s a real innovation. Rachel: Definitely it is in terms of the ingredients. There are other dairy-free ice-cr

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Cutting A Fine Figure

From one chair to three shops – the success of Cut & Sew Barbershop culture is on the rise in Dublin. Barbershops are becoming cultural hotspots. Places you can go not only for a haircut, but for music, design or even a whiskey. By taking the best of New York’s barbershops and adding a touch of creativity and an Irish welcome, Sean Bryan of Cut & Sew has built his business from one chair in the basement of a record shop to three stores in Dublin’s city centre. And he isn’t finished yet. Dublin.ie caught up with Sean to see what’s behind his success. Sean left school after

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Talking business

You’re the HR manager at a Dublin-based corporate. Your new hire has everything you need. Well, nearly everything. All they lack is the conversational English they’ll need for you to get the best out of them. Which is a pity – because that vital project starts in two weeks’ time. You need to talk to Salvatore Fanara and Rosanna Fiorenza of Travelling Languages. But first, romance. He was an engineer from southern Sicily. She was a banker from Turin. It was 2006. Salvatore: We met in Turin a few weeks before we moved to Ireland. Rosanna: He told me that he was planning to go somewhere to improve his English. Salvatore: We were looking to do something different, to make a big change. Rosanna: I decided: look, I’ll quit my job, we’ll pack and we’ll go. Salvatore: London, Dublin, Edinburgh…? In the end we just packed the car and we drove from Turin to Dublin. Rosanna: I worked in banks for another 7 years here. But I‘d had enough of banking, finance, I wanted to change, I wanted to do something else. So we brainstormed. Salvatore: I remember thinking that if I wanted to scale up my own working life I really needed to get up to speed properly from a language perspective with someone who’s not Italian. The starting point was when we realized that a lot of people weren’t satisfied in terms of the results they were getting from traditional language programmes: we’d identified a gap in the market. Rosanna: We came up with the idea for Travelling Languages in 2011 and I finally quit my job in 2013.

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Creative Dublin: James Earley, Street Artist

Adding colour to the walls across Dublin, James Earley is bringing street art out of its sub-cultured roots. By spray painting concepts onto walls, Earley is proving that street art is more than just stylistic. Dublin.ie: How do you feel street artists are perceived? James Earley: Some people have this idea that as a street artist, you could be stand-offish, but that’s not the case at all. The majority of us are very open and want to get people involved. I’ve met a lot of people when I’m working on walls in the city, asking ‘will ya put my name on it’ or ‘can I have a go’ – they’re gas craic! I used to d

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How Dublin Works: The Guinness Enterprise Centre

The Guinness Enterprise Centre, on Taylor’s Lane in the heart of Dublin’s Liberties, is managed by Dublin Business Innovation Centre and has been named the no.1 university associated business incubation centre in the world. In the first of two articles about the GEC, Dublin.ie talks to Eamonn Sayers, the centre’s manager since 2011. Dublin.ie: I’m an entrepreneur. I’ve got an idea. What can the GEC do for me here? Eamonn Sayers: The first step here is that we’ll try and put you in front of an entrepreneur who’s in the same industry. We’ll say have a chat with this person, see what they’re thinking. If you’ve identified your target market, again we’ll say we know someone here who’s in the same market and they’ll have a coffee with you too. Dublin.ie: Then what happens? Eamonn Sayers: Our role here is to help your company grow and scale. We help to make it become better and we help to make you a better entrepreneur. We create an environment and a community and a sense of belonging that makes entrepreneurs very comfortable, makes them enjoy the fact that this is their office, this is their workplace, so that both the entrepreneur and their teams are in the best place to grow their businesses.

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How Dublin Works: Dublin Couriers

Pushbike couriers. You see them milling about on Dublin’s city streets every day. And if you don’t know one, or have never been one, they can be the subject of some curiosity. Why would you want to do that for a living? Is it a real job? Could you live on the money they make? Is it dangerous? Are they crazy? Well, seeing as I used to be one, I can answer some of these questions. But given that was back in the mid to late nineties, I caught up with one of them briefly, one who worked the streets at the time I did, and just so happens to be still out there. The big theme of our chat revolved around how much the city and the job has changed. I always remember couri

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The Guinness Ladies and Hoggers

Guinness has long been part of Dublin’s history and it’s not just the drinking of the black stuff that we’re talking about either. There’s all the industry and activity that surrounds its brewing and its distribution too – and all the memories that are associated with them. Up to 1961, for instance, the barges transporting wooden casks of Guinness along the Liffey would have been a familiar sight. In those days, of course, the Liffey did more than just divide the city in two. It was a major thoroughfare as well. There were six Guinness barges, each named after a Dublin suburban locality: Castleknock, Killiney, Sandyford, Howth, Clonsilla and Seapoint. The bargemen had to

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Stallholders of George’s Street Arcade

George’s Street Arcade is Ireland’s first purpose-built shopping centre, and one of Europe’s oldest, having been built in 1881. We popped in to talk to a few of the stallholders. Milo Póil, Man of Aran Fudge I’m here in the Arcade just over two years, my third Christmas! I am the son of The Man of Aran Fudge! It’s my dad who makes all this stuff, he’s being doing it for 20 years now. It’s actually a family recipe. It’s my Grandmother’s recipe, well, the tiger butter flavour anyway. That recipe was made 90+ years ago with only a few changes! This is one of the only permanent stalls of ours. We’ve another on Ínis Óirr, which is

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Look What’s Popping Up: Fumbally Exchange

It’s been going on for a while. You might call it a movement - a revolution of sorts – but it’s certainly a good idea. It’s the pop-up. Pop-up shops and pop-up spaces have become an increasingly common sight. At Dublin.ie, we wanted to know more. First things first: they don’t go pop, and they’re not inflatable. The term pop-up can cover a lot. But in essence, we’re talking artists, designers and businesses getting the chance to make use of premises they wouldn’t otherwise have access to – all those shops and work spaces that closed during the recession because their tenants couldn’t afford the rent anymore.

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Meet a Dubliner – Ciaran Butler, Smithfield Market Trader

I’m up at four in the morning. The first thirty years are the hardest! After that you’re just up and out. I tippy-toe out the door so I don’t wake the family. I’ve worked six days a week here for thirty years. My father worked here too. I love it. There’s nowhere else in the city that is alive like this market at five o’clock in the morning. It’s bustling with characters, it’s got a heartbeat of its own at that time of the morning. And that’s uplifting. There’s a good bunch of lads there. They’ll stand shoulder to shoulder with you. We’re working under stressful conditions. This morning was two degrees. There was frost on the window, it was bloody freezing - that’s when the character comes out. I’ve got five layers on today. That’s for two degrees. You want to see minus two!

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Dublin Flea Christmas Market

The Dublin Flea Christmas Market is heading into its seventh year and its second in The Point Village. From Friday December 9th to Sunday December 11th the shopping centre will be transformed into a winter wonderland filled with over 100 stalls selling the flea market’s usual retro and vintage wares alongside Irish craft and design. For the first time, this year the Dublin Flea Christmas Market is supported by Dublin City Council and Dublin.ie. We sat down with half of the four-person team behind Dublin Flea, Sharon Greene and Dave Dunn to find out what makes the Christmas Flea Market so special.

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Seven Stories of Creativity – Anne O’ Mahony, The Dressmaker

We all know Grand Canal as the home of Google but unbeknownst to many, tucked among the tech giants is a building where ancient crafts are still practised, THE DESIGN TOWER. The Tower’s seven stories of studios play host to jewellers, fashion designers, conservationists and more. After meeting Violinmaker, Michiel De Hoog Dublin.ie revisited the Tower and met Dressmaker Anne O’ Mahony. Anne O’ Mahony creates made-to-measure pieces as well as costumes for film and theatre, including The Gate’s recent pr

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Dublin Treasures – The Kiosk

Sitting on a small traffic island, amidst that delta of tarmac where Adelaide Road and Leeson Street meet, is a quirky little red-brick kiosk. It’s special place of sanctuary, removed from the lines of traffic and the hustle and bustle of rush hour. The building dates back to 1928. It was designed by architect Michael Moynihan to house a water pressure station, public lavatories (ladies-only!), telephone booth and shop. Now, it’s a small café – and, yes, the coffee is excellent. Ned McCarthy is the current owner and the kiosk has been in the McCarthy family since 1954. It’s not like anything else in Dublin. It’s full of charm and its red-and-white-striped awning makes it look like something out of an old French movie. It’s the detailing that does it. The building itself has some really nice chevron-patterned brickwork and a beautiful city of Dublin coat-of-arms. ‘Let’s be proud of our waterworks, Dubliners!’, it seems to say. The hanging baskets add to the welcoming, family feel and the people behind the counter make this place even more special. The welcome here is as genuine as you’d get anywhere in the city so it’s definitely worth stopping for a morning coffee. Even if it’s just to put you in good humour for the day.

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How Dublin Works: Jam Art Factory

Dublin.ie talks to Mark Haybyrne of Jam Art Factory about his family business and the future of Irish art and design. Since 2011 brothers Mark and John Haybyrne have been showcasing the best of contemporary Irish art and design in their store, Jam Art Factory. Stocking a range of Irish art and design they give independent artists – such as illustrator Claudine O’Sullivan, Arty Smarty Jewellery and KaroArt Ceramics - a platform to exhibit and sell their work. Having started in the Liberties, they now have another thriving store in Temple Bar and ship internationally from jamartfactory.com.

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Seven Stories Of Creativity – Michiel DeHoog, The Violinmaker

We all know Grand Canal as the home of Google but unbeknownst to many, tucked among the tech giants is a building where ancient crafts are still practised, The Design Tower. The Tower’s seven stories of studios play host to jewellers, fashion designers, conservationists and more. The Tower started its life as a sugar refinery in 1862. In 1978 the IDA bought the Tower to form part of their Enterprise Centre with the aim of preserving and restoring it to create a home for many of Dublin’s craftspeople. Today this enterprise is managed by Trinity College. Dublin.ie is going behind the tower walls and meeting its residents to see what it

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How Dublin Works: Stephen Quinn, Jobbio

In that famous TV ad for Donegal Catch, the hapless trawlerman’s recipe ideas are kept ‘on file. In a filing cabinet’. And that’s exactly where they’re going to stay. It was the realization that so many CVs suffer a similar fate that got Stephen Quinn wondering if there wasn’t a better way to organise the world of recruitment – and, he says, ‘bring an old-world industry to life’. Stephen is the CEO of Jobbio and established the company with his brother John Quinn in 2013. His idea was a digital platform that enables people to apply privately to companies they want to work for – with what Jobbio calls a ‘live bio

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How Dublin Works: George’s Fish Shop

Ever wondered what it would be like to be your own boss? Graham Rogerson did. After several years doing shift work in IT he was ready for a change. One thing that got him thinking about opening a shop was that he’d get to meet people. ‘And that didn’t really happen much in IT’, he remembers. The question ‘what sort of a shop?’ was a bit of a no-brainer. Graham is a member of a family with sea water coursing through its veins. His grandfather James and James’s brothers had their own fishing boats. Before they were 12 years old, Graham’s father, George, and his uncle, Tommy, were selling fish on the Coal Quay in Dun Laoghaire. As a child in the 80s

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NovaUCD: Cool Ideas, Hot Tech

It’s an economic truth, universally acknowledged, that innovation is at the core of most successful businesses. This is of course, easier said than done, which is why centres of incubations are so necessary in fostering it. Ireland can proudly boast six bio­-incubation facilities, 16 Institute of Technology and 30 campus innovation hubs, all contributing to making this country one of the globe’s most exciting places for both research and development, and in which to do business. At the heart of all this, you’ll find NovaUCD. Located on the campus of University College Dublin, this state­-of-­the-art facility, which opened its doo

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Building Dublin’s Food Chain

Attention Dubliners: we’re incredibly lucky to inhabit a city with such foodie inclinations and a culinary largesse. Right now, Dublin offers an exquisite blend of Michelin-starred fare, outstanding street food, hipster eateries and friendly local restaurants. And let’s not forget the evolution of our drink culture either. We were once a city of avowed tea drinkers and pint lovers; we’re now as au fait with cocktails and customised artisan coffee blends as any seasoned mixologist or barista – and loving them. We’ve also fully embraced the juicing phenomenon, but still find time for a cuppa. Or three.

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How Dublin Works: DCU Alpha

If you're not entirely sure what the Internet of Things is, or if you haven't even heard of it yet, that's alright. Gentle warning, however: you'd be advised to get on board with the concept at your earliest possible convenience because the Internet of Things, or the IoT, will change everything as we know it, including how we live and work. Essentially, the IoT is a connection of devices to the internet, whether that's your washing machine or your house alarm and everything will be ‘talking’ to the other. On a micro level, that might mean that your alarm clock will tell your coffee machine that it's time to start brewing a pot when you get up; on a macro level the possibilities are infinite, including making cities smarter.

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Meet a Dubliner – Nubi Kayode, Entrepreneur

I’m from Lagos in Nigeria. I originally got into tech blogging, covering the local ecosystem, until I realized that I’d rather be part of the story than write about it. So I launched my first startup, which involved a lot of trial and error, lots of mistakes, lots of learning, and then decided to come to school here. I had read a lot about Dublin on The Next Web, and thought ‘That looks really interesting… everybody’s here.’ So I thought I’d check it out. I came here in 2013 to do my Masters at the Smurfit Business School, after th

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How Dublin Works: The Fumbally

“We have a really great team of people in the kitchen and on the floor, who are really creative and really passionate about what they do.” What is it? The popular Dublin 8 neighbourhood café where the emphasis is on all things wholesome, healthy, ethical and delicious. They’re experimental too, making their own fermented drinks. There’s also The Stables, their complementary space where yoga classes and food workshops happen; it also houses an extra kitchen where they play around with new dishes. Food, wellness and education is at the centre of everything. Who owns it? Aisling Rogerson, who co-founded the café with

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How Dublin Works: Chloé Roux, Airbnb

“You’re always fine-tuning so it’s always challenging; you’re always looking for improvements, no matter what they are, small ones or bigger ones” The Job: Airbnb: the online community marketplace that has transformed the way we book our holiday accommodation. We Irish have taken to the notion of renting out our houses, apartments and spare rooms to visiting folk particularly well, with the number of Dublin hosts growing at somewhat furious rate. Who she is: Chloé Roux, a project manager with Airbnb in Dublin. Originally from Lebanon, she did her MBA in Milan an

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Meet a Dubliner – Hassan Lemtouni, Café Owner

I was born and raised in Morocco, and lived for 30 years in America before coming to Dublin. My wife is a Dubliner, and we have 2 beautiful little girls, and we decided that we wanted them to grow up here. I was lucky enough to step into this beautiful building, The Chocolate Factory on Kings Inn Street, and that opened up a whole new avenue for me, professionally. One of my business partners was looking for a place to put on a gig, and met Val, who runs the building; we started talking about food, and what we’d like to do, and decided to go for it. It took us about a year and a half, but we opened

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