A cosmopolitan lifestyle, rich culture, plenty of public amenities and small-town warmth combine to make Dublin a fun and rewarding place to live. Here’s some of the things you might want to consider before making a move.

What’s the weather like?

Ireland’s climate could be described as mild, moist and changeable. It certainly rains a bit. Dublin gets about 730mm (28 inches) of rain a year – more than London or Paris, less than Copenhagen or Munich. In the height of summer, the sun doesn’t set until almost 10pm. Temperatures rarely drop below freezing and snow is uncommon except on high ground. The mercury tops out at about 20° Celsius in summer. Here are some average temperatures:

  • Winter: November to January 7°C – 10C (44°F – 50°F)
  • Spring: February to April 8°C –12°C (46°F – 54°F)
  • Summer: May to July 17°C – 20°C (64°F – 68°F)
  • Autumn: August to October 14°C – 17°C (57°F – 64°F)
Aerial view of Phoenix Park Dublin

Phoenix Park Dublin

Waterproof coats for summer and winter are good investments, while your bathing suit may have to wait for summer vacations further south.

Recreation

There’s a huge variety of recreational activities in Dublin. We’ve got mountains and sea within a stone’s throw of the city centre. There’s dozens of (mostly) free galleries & museums; year round festivals; bustling markets; delicious dishes in hundreds of restaurants. It’d be remiss if we didn’t mention the almost thousand pubs across the county. From sports bars to music bars to bars that treat sports and music as unnecessary distractions, Publin.ie is the definitive guide.

Other Considerations

Parks & Gardens

Dublin city is no concrete jungle: it’s dotted with open spaces where you can stretch your legs, get some fresh air and soak up nature. First among them is Phoenix Park, one of the largest urban parks in Europe and unique in Dublin. It’s home to a beautiful array of local flora and fauna, as well as historic built heritage: nestled within the park is Áras an Uachtaráin, the home of the president of Ireland; as well as Farmleigh, past home of the Guinness family; medieval

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The school system in Ireland

The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) surveys the world’s education systems every three years. It tests over 500,000 students across 72 countries to measure their abilities in science, maths and reading. Ireland consistently excels in these tests. The most recent results indicate that Irish students perform better than the OECD average across all three categories. Interestingly, immigrant students in Ireland perform better than their counterparts in other countries too. This is a credit to the school system in Ireland and provides one of the best

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Public and private healthcare in Ireland

The system for healthcare in Ireland is divided into two tiers: public and private. While everyone living in Dublin is well served with hospitals and local health services, the system can be difficult to navigate. Here, we cover the basics of using and accessing Dublin’s health services. Public healthcare Ireland’s public healthcare system offers world-class care, partly funded by the Government. Dublin is home to 14 public hospitals, some of which specialise in the likes of cancer services, children’s healthcare and maternity care. Some of these hospitals also have emergency d

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The cost of living in Dublin

Is Dublin expensive? While there are plenty of reasons to live in Dublin, it is not a cheap city. A recent survey by The Economist shows that the cost of living in Dublin is among the highest in Europe. While Dublin is less expensive than Paris, Geneva, Copenhagen, Oslo, Vienna, Helsinki and Frankfurt, it’s more expensive than the likes of Amsterdam, Berlin, Barcelona and Milan. Our nearest neighbours in London pay slightly more for everyday essentials

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Getting Around: Transport in Dublin

There are plenty of options for getting from A to B in Dublin. It is a fairly compact city, which means walking and cycling are viable options. You can walk from many of the city’s outlying districts to its centre in around 30 or 40 minutes. But the public transport in Dublin is pretty good too. It’s one of the benefits that comes with living in the city. Public transport Getting around Dublin by bus Dublin Bus connects most parts of the city through a network of over 100 routes.

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Is Dublin safe to live in?

Is Ireland safe? Ireland is generally a safe place to visit and live. The 2020 Global Peace Index ranks it as the 12th safest country in the world. While we trail behind countries like Denmark, Canada and Japan, we’re streets ahead of our nearest European neighbours. Belgium, the Netherlands, the UK and France rank 17th, 21st, 42nd and 66th, respectively. Ireland’s scores in terms of homicides, weapon imports and imprisoned population are particularly low. According to a 

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