Park Life!

Dublin’s parks have undergone a renaissance in recent years. Once a location for a quiet game of frisbee or a poetic wander amongst the flowerbeds, they have of late been injected with a new vitality. Food stalls, open-air cinema, yoga, and family events are now a given and in the summer months, Dublin’s parks host free lively festivals and original evening events that give the city’s pubs and clubs a run for their money. RUN FOR FUN, WALK FOR HOPE Every Saturday, in parks all over Dublin, early birds can enjoy a free 5k timed parkrun courtesy of parkrun.ie. Operating since 20

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What to do in Dublin this summer

On a summer day in Dublin city, there’s no danger of being bored. Indeed, for a relatively small city (by international standards), there’s always something to do, and this is remarked on by most visitors to the city. Yes, there are tourist attractions worth checking out: the Guinness Storehouse, Trinity College and the Book of Kells, the National Gallery, the Natural History Museum and Christchurch Cathedral are all worth a look, but Dublin really comes alive through its people and its culture. Between theatre, live music, art exhibitions and installations, talks and workshops, comedy and family-friendly events happening Monday to Sunday, right through the yea

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Galz Gone Wild

Dublin is in a unique position for a capital city in that it has both mountains and sea at its doorstep. We caught up with Melissa McDermott – Galz Gone Wild founder – and Ruth Farrell, to find out about the group of women who escape the city to find some scenic hush in the Wicklow mountains. Mel founded the group after moving home from London last year. She found herself lacking direction, and she was unsure of her next step. She started to hike to clear her head, but the hiking community she found were mostly male and older. They were hiking for different reasons. “There is a community there, but it’s very much about getting from point A to point

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Vampire jets and vases at Collins Barracks

The National Museum of Ireland… No, wait a second: ‘the National Museums of Ireland’. That’s right, there’s actually four of them – at four different sites. Three of them are purpose-built; the buildings have always been museums: that’s the Natural History Museum on Merrion Street, the Archaeology Museum on Kildare Street and the Museum of Country Life in Castlebar, Co Mayo. The fourth site, Collins Barracks – which accommodates the Museum of Decorative Arts and History ̵

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Talking Statues

Ten of Dublin’s most eminent statues have been given a new lease of life – and a voice - thanks to a project called Talking Statues by Failte Ireland with support from Sing London and Dublin City Council. Dublin is a city with a rich past. Its history is full of humour, folklore and, most of all, characters - many of whom have been immortalised as statues. James Joyce They stand in parks, on street corners and in galleries. They connect us to a time gone by, and they all have a story to tell. But when was the last time you stopped to look at a statue? Or gave a moment's thought to who it portrays and why it's there? Talking Statues helps us to remember the achievements and ideas of the people who were turned into stone or bronze. It keeps their stories alive using an artfully crafted monologue delivered directly to your phone. Just scan a QR code near the statue, and James Joyce or even Cúchulainn will give you a bell. I can assure you that it takes communing with a statue to a whole new level.

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Dublin Treasures – Sunlight Chambers

‘Sunlight Chambers’, it says over the door of the office building on the corner of Parliament Street and Essex Quay. What a lovely name! But why is the building called that? Facing north across the Liffey, it certainly wasn’t catching many rays when Dublin.ie visited on a day in December. With its arched windows and overhanging eaves, it looks like an Italian palace, built perhaps for a cadet branch of the Medici family c1500. But hang on a second, what’s with the strange 3D decorations stuck on the walls of the first and second storeys? There’s nude babies, a donkey, a man building a boat, two men constructing an arch, a bunch of Renaissance-styl

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Meet A Dubliner – Pat Liddy, Tour Guide

Pat Liddy is many things. An artist, historian, writer, illustrator, broadcaster, mapmaker, and environmental lobbyist who has helped make Dublin a global tourist attraction. The author and illustrator of over seven books on the city, as well as others on Irish cultural sites, he is the operator of Pat Liddy’s Walking Tours of Dublin. I was born and reared in what we might call the inner city, which in this case was Phibsborough. So, in the first place, that qualifies me as a true Dubliner, because the definition is “Born between the canals,” isn’t it? If I wanted to come

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2017 in Dublin Moments

And another one bites the dust… Like a fleeting Twitter trend, 2017 has been and gone – but not without leaving its mark. We’ve rounded up 10 of Dublin’s stand-out moments and memories from the last 12 months. 1. There she blows! Hurricane Ophelia brought the country to a standstill this year, uprooting trees, ripping roofs off houses – and stirring the sea into a foamy swimming pool for those who couldn’t spend a day without a dive at the Forty Foot. While the rest of Ireland battened down the hatches, Dublin rejoiced at a traffic-free Mon

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Dublin Treasures – Temple Bar Icon Walk

Pitching itself as “the greatest story ever strolled”, the Icon Walk cracks the heart of the Irish people wide open and tie-dyes the backstreets of Temple Bar with its vibrant colours. Like spokes from a hub, the walk’s rainbow-painted laneways radiate outwards from The Icon Factory, a gallery and shop at the corner of Aston Place and Bedford Lane. Founded in 2009 by Barney Phair, this not-for-profit artists’ co-operative is run for the benefit of the many creatives that ply their wares here. These streets are an unexpected treasure trove of culture and colour, splashed across spray-p

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Creative Dublin: Galia Arad, Singer-songwriter

Galia (pronounced Ga-lee-ah) Arad is just back from playing support on Marc Almond’s UK tour. Last year, she toured Ireland with Jack L. She regularly tours Europe with Jools Holland, most recently playing support for him at the 3Arena in Dublin. And she owes it all to Shane McGowan and his manager Joey Cashman, who in a strange, unexpected way set Galia’s music career in train and took her from small-time gigging in New York to centre stage at the Royal Albert Hall. Coming from a classically trained background, Galia moved to New York from her Indiana home in her early twenties to pursue a singer-songwriter career with a musical style that she calls “Bob Dylan meets

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The Vexillologist

It’s a fine brisk November morning when Dublin.ie meets up with Ed Boden at his office in Blessington Basin, the north side’s secret park. But we are not here to talk about Ed’s job as chief of parks today. No, we are talking about another curious string to Ed’s professional bow. Curious, quirky and colourful. Because Ed is the Dublin City Council vexillologist. “He’s the what?” I hear you say. Well join the club, I said it myself. But if you are stuck for the answer, we’ll give you a clue. A clue that comes from a recent Nobel Laureate who told us “The answer my friend is blowing in the wind, the answer is blowing in the wind.” Flags. It’s unlikely Dy

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A City of Words: Slam Sunday

Slam Poetry made its loud and unruly debut in early 1990s urban America, delivering vociferous, impassioned political postcards from the marginalised edge. It’s argued that hip-hop was slam’s mentor. But there’s also a debt there to the jazz-drenched free-form prose of the 50s Beat artists. Then, of course, the potent raw energy of Punk played its part. Today we’re at Slam Sunday, Dublin’s main slam show. The popular monthly event has Temple Bar’s Filmbase packed out as usual. It’s 6.30pm and the crowd of some 100, all armed with tea and biscuits, are primed. A handful wil

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