There are a number of different factors to consider when planning to bring your pet to Ireland:

1. Your country of origin

EU countries

Pet dogs, cats and ferrets from EU member states can travel freely within other EU member states, once they have an up-to-date EU Pet Passport.

If bringing more than five animals, you must have a veterinary cert to prove that each has been examined within the previous 48 hours.

Non-EU countries

Cats, dogs and ferrets from outside EU member states are divided into two groups: qualifying low-risk countries; and non-qualifying high-risk countries.

Low-risk countries

Pets from low-risk qualifying countries must be microchipped; subsequently be vaccinated against rabies; and have a veterinary health cert (specifically Annex IV to Commission Implementing Decision 577/2013), to certify that they are currently immunised against rabies. Dogs must also be treated against tapeworm between 24-120 hours before arriving in Ireland.

High-risk countries

Pets from high-risk non-qualifying countries must first be microchipped; subsequently be vaccinated against rabies; get a rabies blood test, which must take place at least three months in advance of entering the country; and have a veterinary health cert (specifically Annex IV to Commission Implementing Decision 577/2013), to certify that they are currently immunised against rabies. Dogs must also be treated against tapeworm between 24-120 hours before arriving in Ireland.

You can find more information on importing pet dogs, cats or ferrets on the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine’s website; as well as details on bringing your pet rabbit, bird or rodent from either inside or outside the EU.

pet passport

2. Your EU Pet Passport

This certifies that the animal is from an eligible country; microchipped; has been vaccinated against rabies within the previous 21 days; and treated against tapeworm between 24-120 hours before travel, unless coming from the UK, Finland or Malta.

3. Travel into the country

If you are travelling from one of the countries listed below, you can enter Ireland via any port or airport; and the airline or ferry company you are using is obligated to notify the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine of your pet’s arrival at least 24 hours in advance:

Any EU member state, Andorra, Gibraltar, Greenland and the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Lichtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland, The Vatican.

If you are coming from any other country, you may only enter the country via Dublin airport; and you must also notify the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine yourself by completing an advance notice form and emailing it to petmove@agriculture.gov.ie at least 24 hours before your arrival. It is at the airline’s discretion whether your pet may travel with you in the cabin, or as excess baggage.

If your pet does not meet the requirements stated above, it may be refused entry to Ireland, or held in quarantine to be tested, microchipped or vaccinated as required.

4. How and where to apply for permission to import your pet

The Citizens Information website holds all information necessary to apply to bring your pet to Ireland.

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